Dyson decides to build its electric vehicles in Singapore solidstate batteries become

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Dyson, best known for its vacuums, is still moving forward with its multi-billion-dollar plan to launch several new electric vehicles.The British company has now announced that it will build the cars in Singapore and those vehicles are unlikely to be equipped with solid-state batteries. more…The post Dyson decides to build its electric vehicles in Singapore, solid-state batteries become less likely appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Tesla releases rare look inside Gigafactory 2 with solar roof tile production

first_imgTesla is ramping production at Gigafactory 2, where they manufacture their solar roof tiles and where Panasonic manufactures exclusive solar panels for the company.Now they are releasing rare new images of inside the factory. more…The post Tesla releases rare look inside Gigafactory 2 with solar roof tile production images appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

BMW Exec Suggests Automaker Should Work With Elon Musk

first_imgThis BMW exec knows the automaker must make its own batteries to surge forward with EVs.In a recent interview with Manager Magazin, BMW works council chief Manfred Schoch stated that he believes BMW must make its own batteries to be successful with its EV future. This makes perfect sense since arguably the most successful EV maker — Tesla — has flourished due to its Gigafactory and partnership with Panasonic.Additional Tesla Battery Content: Source: Electric Vehicle News Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Tesla Batteries Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 10, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Panasonic Sees Gigafactory 1 Profit In Near Future Schoch gave the utmost praise to Tesla CEO Elon Musk. He says that Musk’s decision to focus on EV battery production is commendable. In addition, the automaker’s decision to secure a viable partnership with a major player in the battery segment is praiseworthy. He shared (translated from German):Tesla controls the entire value chain; they understood electromobility.Tesla has far surpassed all other automakers on the electric car front. It’s really the only truly prosperous electric vehicle maker at this point, though company has struggled to show a continuing profit. Its investments in the future have been monumental, and Tesla is just finally catching up on its massive spending. Still, Schoch is of the opinion that BMW should be getting on board with similar plans if it wants to prevail. He asserts:Tesla made in the third quarter at a good 6 billion dollars in sales 312 million profit, BMW came in the automotive segment at 21 billion euros to 784 million surplus. Who deserves better? Many automakers are slowly adding electric vehicles into the mix. Still, BMW far exceeds many others. It currently only offers one pure-electric vehicle: The i3. However, it also manufactures plenty of plug-in hybrids that sell reasonably well. In the coming years, the brand intends to up the EV ante considerably.Shoch sees communication and/or some type of partnership with Tesla and Elon Musk as a reasonable strategy to secure BMW’s electric car future. He says that there are too many complaints in the automotive industry and too many people claiming that certain progress is impossible. He points to Tesla’s achievements and concludes:Our board members should finally deal more intensively with this gentleman [Elon Musk], who should have been bankrupt by now.Source: Teslamag.de Tesla Gigafactory Creates Jobs & Huge Monetary Benefits For Nevadalast_img read more

Ford F250 PlugIn Hybrid Pickup Truck Comes To Life Via XL

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News Electric Truck Market Potential Is Massive See Rivian R1T Electric Pickup Truck At Rock Climb Event: Video Ford F-150 Electric Pickup Truck Spied For First Time XL says that the F-150 PHEV was in 2018 delivered to “municipal and utility fleets including CPS Energy, Tacoma Public Utility, City of Palo Alto, and many more”.“As with the PHEV F-150, which has been proven to provide up to a 50 percent MPG improvement and 33 percent CO2 emissions reduction, the PHEV F-250 will include a driveshaft-mounted electric motor powered by a lithium ion battery pack that can be charged using standard level 2 and 1 chargers.  The truck will also feature regenerative braking, enabling it to store energy in the battery while slowing and then use that energy to help propel the vehicle during acceleration.  Because the XL plug-in hybrid electric system works in parallel with the factory gas-powered engine, fleets will not need to be concerned over vehicle range, performance or infrastructure requirements, and XL’s Ford eQVM certification ensures that all standard OEM warranties on the vehicle will remain intact.Product specifications will be available during the NTEA show, and XL will display a PHEV F-250 in its booth (#3175).  The company will be holding a press conference in its booth on Wednesday, March 6 at 3:40 PM to formally launch the vehicle to the fleet industry.  For more information about the PHEV F-250, including early access to the details that will be made available at the show, fleet managers can also visit www.xlfleet.com/PHEV-F250.” Ford doesn’t make them, so XL will.XL soon will expand its offer by adding the plug-in hybrid Ford F-250 pickup truck, which will be introduced at the NTEA Work Truck show, March 5-8 in Indianapolis.Just like in the case of the XL Ford F-150 PHEV, the F-250 will get a driveshaft-mounted electric motor and lithium-ion battery pack, which enables assist for the engine when accelerating and regenerative braking, significantly lowering fuel consumption and emissions. The batteries can be charged externally through a standard J1772 plug.The F-150 was equipped with 15 kWh battery behind the cab (see specs here).See Also Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 6, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Is Tesla Model 3 Or Model S A Better Choice For Road

first_imgAbove: Tesla Model S alongside an old school camper (Instagram: Steve Sasman)Let’s just say, Tesla has come a long way in 6 years. My 2012 Model S is still an incredible car and it’s still years ahead of any non-Tesla on the road, but the Model 3 is the shiny new object…Check Out These Stories: Tesla Model 3, Model S And Model X Compared: Range, Price, 0-60 New Tesla Model 3 vs Second-Hand Model S: Video Above: The larger Model S with its hatchback is preferable in “Camper Mode” along with twin air mattress and comforter (Photo: Steve Sasman*)Road Trip Champion?It depends…Model 3: if you are not sleeping in the car, or for a shorter trip.Model S: if you are car camping or on a week or longer trip.Either way, you can’t go wrong road tripping in a Tesla. It’s such a more enjoyable and less expensive way to travel. The myth is Supercharging adds tons of time to your trip. Not true. Most of your stops are 20–40 minutes and you are doing stuff you would be doing anyway like eating, restroom stops, or catching up on work. Be assured that buying a Tesla will be the best car buying decision you’ve ever made. It certainly has been for me.===*Steve Sasman is a Tesla experimenter and 48 state road tripper at TeslaRenter.com; he’s also a sharing economy enabler at FlagstaffRentalCabin.com.*Editor’s Note: EVANNEX, which also sells aftermarket gear for Teslas, has kindly allowed us to share some of its content with our readers, free of charge. Our thanks go out to EVANNEX. Check out the site here. Above: Activating “Camper Mode” with moon rising and horses grazing on a farm in Oregon 2000+ miles from home (Twitter: Steve Sasman)On August 1, 2018, I set out to be the first human to drive a Tesla to every single USA Tesla Store in the lower 48 States. I drove my 2012 Model S P85 for the first 12,100 miles and 42 States east of Arizona. After that, I took my brand new Model 3 Performance for the last 6 States. The Model 3 started with 25 miles on the odometer and ended the trip with 4,370 miles just two flawless weeks later. Monumental Tesla Road Trip: 48 States, 107 Stores, Unparalleled Discoveries Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 21, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News WHICH TESLA IS BETTER FOR ROAD TRIPS, MODEL 3 OR MODEL S?Guest Contributor: Steve Sasman*; Editor’s Note: Driving both an older Model S and new Model 3, Steve went on an epic 48 state road trip visiting 107 Tesla stores, meeting over 500 Tesla employees, and uncovering some helpful Tesla road trip hacks. Here, Steve compares both Tesla sedans, Model S vs. Model 3, during his remarkable road trip adventures.*This article comes to us courtesy of EVANNEX (which also makes aftermarket Tesla accessories). Posted by Matt Pressman. The opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily our own at InsideEVs. Above: Supercharging the Model 3 (Twitter: Steve Sasman)SizeThe old Model S still has a few benefits over the newer Model 3. First: Size. The frunk is bigger, and the back/trunk is as well. This comes in handy for luggage/supplies as well as sleeping in the car.Car CampingObviously, a huge percentage of people will have zero desire to try this, but you would be surprised how many Tesla owners actually do camp in their car. Believe it or not, I’m 6’3″ and can still sleep fully stretched out in the Model 3, but it’s certainly tighter [than the Model S] with an additional annoyance of the shelf that isn’t removable which does limit your range of motion when turning over. So, which one is the better road trip car?AutopilotMy old 2012 Model S doesn’t have Autopilot. So, I actually had to drive all 12,000 miles myself. Oh, the horror!Those who say Autopilot is a game changer are not kidding. It really makes road trips a breeze since most of your trip is highway miles where Autopilot shines.SuperchargingAs far as Supercharging, the 3 is fantastic. Since it’s smaller and more efficient, it charges faster than the S, which means less charging time to go the same distance. Also, since the Long Range battery has a range over 300 miles it also has a bigger sweet spot of faster charging compared to my P85 S which has a range of 240 miles now. FYI, batteries charge much faster the first 3/4 of the charge than the final 1/4 to top it off. This is why I always suggest getting the biggest battery you can afford if road trips are in your future.last_img read more

Ireland Will Get Its First Electric Bus A Volvo 7900e

first_imgIt seems that Ireland was omitted in bus electrificationWe have lived to a time when the number of all-electric buses is counted is hundred of thousands globally. There are however still entire countries where there are none.For example, Ireland will get its first electric bus later this year. It will be a single door 12m Volvo 7900 Electric ordered for Crowne Plaza Dublin Airport Hotel.“This will be the first electric bus to go into operation in Ireland and will provide an efficient and environmentally friendly service for passenger transfers at Dublin Airport.The partners in the project are Volvo Buses, Crowne Plaza Hotel and energy company ESB. The bus will be deployed at the end of the year on a route which operates between the Crown Plaza, Holiday Inn Express and Terminals 1 and 2 at Dublin Airport.” Florida State University Transitions To 100% Electric Bus Fleet The bus will be equipped with a 200 kWh battery and fast charging option up to 150 kW using CCS Combo 2 plug.The photo above presents one of the eight fully electric Volvo 7900 buses in operation in Harrogate, UK.Nick Page, Managing Director for Volvo Bus UK & Ireland, said:“We’re really pleased that the 7900e has been chosen to provide services for these hotels in and around Dublin Airport and that it will be the first electric bus to enter operation anywhere in Ireland.”“We’ve seen from experience with the 7900e the kind of contribution that can be made to improving air quality. In addition to the UK trials, it has been successfully tried and tested across Europe in countries including Sweden, Germany, Belgium and Luxembourg.“ BYD Produced 50,000 Electric Buses In Nine Years BYD Delivered World’s Largest Electric Double-Decker Bus Fleetcenter_img EV buses Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 23, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

MiniAOC Part II

first_imgCategories: Politics Tags: AOC, Humor « Euro-Skeptics Score Big – Will Brussels Reform? What Comes After Trump is What We Need to be Concerned About »last_img

Scientific understanding of PSTD points to new treatment and prevention strategies

first_imgMay 10 2018Recent advances in scientific understanding of how posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops and persists may lead to more effective treatment and even prevention of this debilitating disorder, according to the May/June special issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry, published by Wolters Kluwer.A growing body of evidence helps psychiatrists to understand the aspects of brain structure and function involved in PTSD, informing efforts to interrupt the processes leading to the development of PTSD symptoms in traumatized individuals, according to an introductory article by Guest Editor Kerry J. Ressler, MD, PhD, of McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Belmont, Mass. Dr. Ressler writes: “PTSD, while one of the most recently defined syndromes in psychiatry, may also be one of the earliest to benefit from progress in neurobiology and advances in translational approaches to brain function and behavior.”Understanding Dysfunctional Fear and Emotional Processes May Improve Treatment for PTSDDr. Ressler notes that patients with PTSD have “characteristic reexperiencing, avoidance, and hyperarousal symptoms,” which can persist for months or years after exposure to traumatic events. Posttraumatic stress disorder affects about 6 percent of the population, but the rate is much higher in groups exposed to severe trauma, such as combat veterans, refugees, and assault victims.Although PTSD is at least partly genetic, it also depends on personal history of trauma in childhood and adulthood, as well as psychological factors linked to mediation of fear and regulation of emotions. “Therefore, PTSD is among the most likely of psychiatric disorders to be understood from the perspective of environmental influences interacting with biological vulnerability,” according to Dr. Ressler. The special issue provides expert updates in four key areas related to the development, diagnosis, and management of PTSD: Scientific understanding of human fear responses provides important insights into how PTSD develop and persists. The mechanism of “fear extinction” – in which learned fear is suppressed by new learning – is highly relevant to PTSD and its treatment. Dr. Ressler notes that effective treatments for PTSD, particularly exposure therapy, are based on the mechanisms of fear extinction. Research has also made strides in identifying the brain structures and functions involved in emotion dysregulation of PTSD. Studies have identified biomarkers of these dysregulated processes, including abnormal functioning of the body’s stress responses and dysfunction of a brain areas called the hippocampus and amygdala, which are involved in memory and emotional responses. These discoveries may point toward treatments targeting stress hormones and functioning of these brain regions. The concept of resilience – the ability to adapt successfully to trauma or threat – is being studied to explain why some traumatized individuals develop PTSD symptoms while others do not. Interventions to promote resilience have potential not only as a treatment for people with PTSD, but for also preventing it in populations at risk of trauma. Evidence-based treatments. The special issue concludes with a review and update of evidence behind the range of “reasonably effective” treatments for PTSD. Psychotherapy approaches address the underlying dysfunctions of fear extinction and emotion regulation. A class of antidepressants (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) are the only FDA-approved medications for PTSD, but many other drugs may be used off-label to treat specific symptoms. While current treatments do address the underlying mechanisms of PTSD, many patients do not improve or continue having symptoms, while others might have a better response to individualized treatment approaches. “Advances in neurobiology and behavioral science are needed for truly targeted, innovative, robust treatments and preventions,” Dr. Ressler concludes.center_img Source:https://wolterskluwer.com/last_img read more

Human Nose Can Detect a Trillion Smells

Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A rose, a fresh cup of coffee, a wood fire. These are only three of the roughly 1 trillion scents that the human nose and brain are capable of distinguishing from each other, according to a new study. Researchers had previously estimated that humans could sense only about 10,000 odors but the number had never been explicitly tested before.“People have been talked into this idea that humans are bad at detecting smells,” says neurobiologist Leslie Vosshall of Rockefeller University in New York City, who led the new work. “So these findings should give the whole human race a confidence boost.”Humans detect smells by inhaling air that contains odor molecules, which then bind to receptors inside the nose, relaying messages to the brain. Most scents are composed of many odorants; a whiff of chocolate, for example, is made up of hundreds of different odor molecules. Understanding how people process the complex information contained in scents—or memories of smells—offers a window into how the human brain functions. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Vosshall says she and others in the field had long guessed that the number of detectable scents often cited in the literature, based on rough calculations made in the 1920s of the known groups and ranges of smells—claiming that humans could distinguish 10,000 odors—was way off. So her lab decided to test it once and for all. They took 128 odor molecules that represented a wide range of smells and started combining them into unique mixtures containing 10, 20, or 30 different components. Then, they recruited volunteers from the community, aged 20 to 48, to start sniffing the mixtures. “The people we invited to do this study were not professionals; they were not wine tasters or perfumers,” Vosshall says.Each volunteer was given three smell-containing vials at a time—two that were identical and one that was a slightly different mixture—and then was asked which was the odd one out. On average, if the components varied by more than 50%, the scientists found, people could distinguish the smells as different. When Vosshall’s team crunched these numbers, extrapolating how many different combinations of the 128 odorants an average person could differentiate, they arrived at an average of 1 trillion smells.Individual performance, however, varied, they report online today in Science. The researchers calculated that the least successful smeller in the study would be able to smell only 80 million unique scents. And the best performer had a far more sensitive sense of smell, likely able to distinguish more than a thousand trillion odors.The ability to distinguish a trillion scents from one another when they’re paired up, though, doesn’t mean that humans can identify a trillion different scents, says neurologist Jay Gottfried of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. “Even if humans can distinguish that many odors based on these projected mixtures, I don’t know if there are really 1 trillion unique odors in the world that we would need to be discriminating.”Gottfried adds, however, that the study brings up interesting questions regarding how complex smells are sensed by the nose and brain. “In general, it highlights a growing interest in how combinations of odors—rather than single odor molecules at a time—are sensed and processed.”Vosshall and her colleagues are pursuing some of these questions, including whether certain combinations of odors are indistinguishable despite being very different at a molecular level. But for now, she just hopes the new findings encourage people to take another sniff at the world around them.“Knowing we have these capabilities, I hope people, as they go about their business, start saying, ‘Hey, I can smell all these things.’ Maybe the companies that make scented products will start making greater use of the human capacity and develop cleaners and perfumes with new, more interesting scents,” she says. “Maybe we’re going to start using those corners of our smell capacity that have just not been exercised lately.” read more

Humans not solely to blame for passenger pigeon extinction

When the last passenger pigeon died at a zoo in 1914, the species became a cautionary tale of the dramatic impact humans can have on the world. But a new study finds that the bird experienced multiple population booms and crashes over the million years before its final demise. The sensitivity of the population to natural fluctuations, the authors argue, could have been what made it so vulnerable to extinction.“This is a very nice piece of research,” says paleornithologist Helen James of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., who was not involved in the work. “I hope we can take what we learn from this and begin to build better ways of determining a species’ extinction risk.”In the 1800s, the passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius), named after the French word passager for “passing by,” was the most abundant bird in the world. It accounted for more than a quarter of all birds in North America, with an estimated population of 3 billion to 5 billion. The species traveled in enormous flocks, as wide as a mile and many miles long, and could strip an area of nuts within days. When the last passenger pigeon died in 1914, ecologists blamed deforestation and overhunting; the bird had become a popular source of cheap meat for both human consumption and livestock feed. But the story didn’t add up for everyone. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email “We thought that some piece was probably missing in this puzzle,” says Chih-Ming Hung, a biologist at National Taiwan Normal University in Taipei. “If people are just killing pigeons one by one, even combined with habitat loss, it’s still hard to believe they can go down in number so fast.”Hung and his colleagues collected tiny tissue samples from four well-preserved passenger pigeons held at museums around the world and used cutting-edge genetic technology to sequence the animals’ DNA, as well as the DNA of a modern relative, the domestic pigeon. By comparing the genes from each bird, Hung’s team was able to determine how the overall passenger pigeon population had changed over the years. At any given time, a smaller population of birds means less genetic diversity.Hung found that before Europeans settled in North America, the passenger pigeon population was already far from steady. Instead, the number of pigeons had fluctuated by up to 1000-fold during multiple population shrinkages and growths over the previous million years. Such massive fluctuations aren’t typical for any species. The researchers suspect that climate-driven shifts in the availability of acorns, one of the pigeon’s primary food sources, might be responsible. These shifts  matched up with the fluctuations in population size. But they have no way to prove the connection.The findings suggest that the passenger pigeons’ extinction may not have been solely due to human influence. Instead, the double whammy of an already natural population decline coupled with the pressures of hunting and population loss may have done the bird in, Hung and colleagues report online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “If it’s already on this track, human influence can further increase the speed that the population goes down,” Hung says. “And once it gets down to some really low level, there’s no way for the birds to recover.”Beth Shapiro, a paleogenomics researcher at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who also studies the passenger pigeon’s genetic past, says the new data are encouraging and fit with her own group’s unpublished findings. “I think the discovery that their populations regularly fluctuate in size makes these birds even more fascinating,” she says. “This is not what we consider normal behavior.”More work will still be needed, though, she points out, to fill in gaps in the pigeons’ natural history. The genetic data show only very long-term trends, and thus don’t reveal what the birds’ last decades were like. It’s also unclear which biological properties of the passenger pigeons made them so prone to population fluctuations. If biologists can answer these questions, Shapiro says, they may be able to identify other species that, while they are plentiful in number and not considered at risk of extinction by classical methods, could be in danger of an unexpected die-off. read more

Glowing sharks sport unusual eyes

first_imgDeep in the twilight zone of the ocean, small, glowing sharks have evolved special eye features to maximize the amount of light they see, researchers report this week in PLOS ONE. The scientists mapped the eye shape, structure, and retina cells of five deep-sea bioluminescent sharks, predators that live 200 to 1000 meters deep in the ocean, where light hardly penetrates. The sharks have developed many coping strategies. Their eyes possess a higher density of light-sensing cells known as rods than those of nonbioluminescent sharks, which might enable them to see fast-changing light patterns. Such ability would be particularly useful when the animals emit light to communicate with one another. Some species also have a gap between the lens and the iris to allow extra light in the retina, a feature previously unknown in sharks. In the eyes of lanternsharks, pictured above, the scientists discovered a translucent area in the upper socket. The researchers suspect this feature might help the sharks adjust their glow to match the sunlight for camouflage.last_img read more

Galápagos research center may shut down

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A 50-year-old conservation organization dedicated to preserving the biodiversity hotspot that inspired Charles Darwin is about to fall off a financial cliff and could close before the end of the year.The Charles Darwin Foundation, based in Ecuador’s Galápagos Islands, has helped control goats, blackberries, and other invasive species while working to restore populations of endangered species, notably giant tortoises and mangrove finches. It also helps review applications to the Galápagos National Park from researchers and handles logistics for the approved projects.Over the decades, however, it has struggled to make ends meet, and on Monday its general assembly may decide to shut its doors for lack of funding. “Our donors are generous when it comes to science but not in maintaining the institution,” explains Dennis Geist, a volcanologist at the University of Idaho in Moscow and chair of the foundation’s board of directors. “It has been in a precarious financial position for many, many years,” adds board member Judy Diamond, an ethologist and science educator of the University of Nebraska State Museum in Lincoln. Email One problem for the $3-million-a-year foundation is supporting a growth spike that occurred a decade ago, say Peter and Rosemary Grant, Princeton University evolutionary biologists who have spent their careers studying Darwin’s finches there. Its research station has lived hand to mouth, Geist says, and over time debts built up.Two potential solutions involved selling off parcels of land it owned and operating a gift shop for the 150,000 tourists who visit the Galápagos each year. The store “was the cornerstone of a long-term plan to create an income-generating facility that would provide ongoing support,” Diamond says, with revenue from the land sales paying off debt and providing operating expenses. Several parcels were sold, although one large deal fell through at the last minute.“We would have survived if that had been the only problem,” Geist says. But it wasn’t.The store, which opened in February, was on track to earn $400,000 annually. But the local Puerto Ayora authorities shut it down in July, presumably after local shop owners complained about the competition. The loss of income means no money for Internet service, electricity, and the salaries of the accounting department, Geist says.Swen Lorenz, the foundation’s executive director, believes that the national government should rescue the organization, but “I’m worried about the time it is taking.” Geist and Lorenz are hoping for a bailout from the foundation’s two largest supporters, the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, based in New York City, and the Galapagos Conservancy, based in Fairfax, Virginia. But so far neither has committed itself to additional contributions. In May, the Helmsley Trust awarded a 3-year, $2 million grant for conservation. And the Galapagos Conservancy contributes more than $500,000 per year.The conservancy was actually formed about 20 years ago when the foundation wanted to invest endowment funds it had acquired. For several years almost all the money raised by the conservancy and a parallel organization called the Galapagos Conservation Trust in the United Kingdom went toward the foundation. But now, only about 30% does, Geist says. “They give us money when they want to” and donate the rest to other causes.Nicholas Mark Collins, chair of the board of the Galapagos Conservation Trust in London, says that the organization is more comfortable funding specific research projects. Having the foundation close “would be a very serious matter that will be regretted worldwide,” he said, but “we’re not sitting on a pile of money that we can pass along.”Foundation officials haven’t given up, launching a Web fundraising campaign and membership drive that would allow the organization to limp along into next year. If it doesn’t succeed, much would be lost. The foundation has a captive breeding program for mangrove finches that has recently produced offspring. It’s also home to the islands’ specimen collections and the archive of visiting scientists.“It could all vanish,” Lorenz says. Board member William Sutherland, a conservation biologist at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, thinks that result “would clearly be a disaster for both fundamental research and conservation.”center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Into the light Restoring vision

first_img Project Prakash/Pawan Sinha Graham Crouch/AP Project Prakash/Pawan Sinha Drawings and writing by Manoj after cataract surgery. Neuroscientist Pawan Sinha meets blind children in a village in northern India in 2002. The experience “convinced me of the need to launch Project Prakash,” he says. Manoj bicycles to work in Gorakhpur. It took him almost 18 months after surgery before his brain could interpret what his eyes were seeing. “Now, I can ride a bicycle even through a crowded market,” he says. By Rhitu ChatterjeeOct. 22, 2015 , 1:45 PM After cataract surgery, children participate in a project called Unruly Art at Dr. Shroff’s Charity Hospital. The project introduces them to colors and shapes and helps them improve their visual-motor coordination skills. It also forges friendships, says Into the light: Restoring vision Project Prakash After cataract surgery, children participate in a project called Unruly Art at Dr. Shroff’s Charity Hospital. The project introduces them to colors and shapes and helps them improve their visual-motor coordination skills. It also forges friendships, says A Prakash patient takes an acuity test at Dr. Shroff’s Charity Eye Hospital in New Delhi. After surgery, vision improves but remains impaired—so most patients wear glasses. India has the largest number of blind children in the world, many of whom are born with cataracts. A simple surgery early in life can reverse this condition. But in India, poverty and lack of access to health care consign most children with congenital cataracts to a life in darkness. Project Prakash was launched in 2004 to provide cataract surgery to older children and young adults who were considered beyond help, because they are past a critical age when vision develops in the brain. The project has so far brought nearly 500 children and young adults into the light, and in the process has revealed surprising insights into how the brain learns to see. Read the full story here.center_img Project Prakash/Pawan Sinha A Project Prakash scientist tests a child after cataract surgery to see whether he can tell objects in a picture apart. Most kids flunk the test early in their recovery. But within 10 to 18 months after surgery, their brains can master the task. Manoj Yadav, 22 (left) and his younger brother, Dilip Yadav, 14 at a residential facility for blind boys in Gorakhpur, India. The brothers were born with cataracts in both eyes and were blind until 2011, when they underwent cataract surgery thanks to Proj Graham Crouch/AP Graham Crouch/AP Manoj Yadav, 22 (left) and his younger brother, Dilip Yadav, 14 at a residential facility for blind boys in Gorakhpur, India. The brothers were born with cataracts in both eyes and were blind until 2011, when they underwent cataract surgery thanks to Proj Graham Crouch/AP ‹› Manoj listens to an audio book. Cataract surgery at age 18 gave him the unexpected gift of sight, but his vision isn’t as sharp as that of normally sighted people. He struggles to read the fine print in text books, so he must rely on audio lessons for his Project Prakash/Pawan Sinha Project Prakash/Pawan Sinha last_img read more

13 Welfare Queens Arrested With More White Women…

first_img SUBSCRIBE Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. Since the Ronald Reagan era, Black people in general, but Black women, in particular, have been synonymous with public assistance. Many have even been labeled “welfare queens.” Despite the data showing how white people make up the majority of welfare recipients, the African American community still has to deal with the stereotype that most Black people not only need welfare but will steal it too.But a recent bust in New York continues to prove that government officials should really be side-eyeing people of a paler skin tone. Where All The Presidential Candidates Stand On Reparations, In Their Own Words If convicted the women can face 4-7 year prison sentences, 5 years of probation, a fine and having to pay restitution in the amount of what they stole.Though the case in St. Lawrence County is frustrating because there are so many people who are actually living below the poverty line that need those resources, it in no way proves that many “welfare reformers” are right about rampant welfare fraud as an excuse to slowly drain funding for programs. According to Lexington Law, 10.6 percent of federal welfare was found to be improperly or fraudulently paid in 2016. In most cases, fraud is found to be improperly filed due to an error made by a caseworker.SEE ALSO:Black St. Louis Officer Shot By White Cop After Identifying Himself Sues The CityPhoenix Police Chief Promises ‘Change’ As Cops Who Terrorized Black Family Aren’t Fired St. Lawrence County Welfare Fraud , welfare , white women Jamaican Republican Who Is Running Against AOC Supported Her A Year Ago On Friday, authorities in St. Lawrence County, New York arrested 13 white women for welfare fraud with four more arrests pending. According to police, the women stole $104,000 from people who actually needed it.center_img Reparations presidential candidates Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. More By Megan Sims White Tears! Former Meteorologist Files Lawsuit Claiming He Was Fired Because Of Diversity “Here in St. Lawrence County, our welfare benefits provide vital support to genuinely needy families at great cost to honest hard working taxpayers,” District Attorney Gary Pasqua said in a statement. “Those individuals who gain benefits through deception are stealing medicine, groceries, and other necessary provisions from innocent children, vulnerable seniors, working citizens, and others in need.”Georgeanna L. Aldous, 47, Kandy L. Butler, 29, Brandi David, 41, Ashley Debiew, 25, Cara E. Dimon, 25, Jessica Driscoll, 29, Crystal L. Lalone, 39, Amber Morrill, 35, Kerry M. Pelo, 36, Star L. Perrin, 39, Lynn A. Ryan, 46, Sherri A. Scott, 51 and Nancy G. Sherman, 27, all stole individual amounts of welfare that ranged from $1,000 up to over $31,000. All the women failed to accurately report their income and have been charged with varying degrees of welfare fraud that ranged from the third and fourth degree. Their arrests, which were the largest sweep in the history of the county, were made possible following an investigation by the St. Lawrence County Social Services Fraud Unit, District Attorney Fraud Investigator and the St. Lawrence County District Attorneys Office.“[I am] proud of the professionalism and participation of the Sheriff’s Department in carrying out this operation, which is critical to deterring abuse of the taxpayers and ensuring that these critical resources go to those in need,” St. Lawrence County Sheriff Kevin Wells said. Morehouse Students Take To Social Media And Claim Sexual Harassment Complaints Were Ignoredlast_img read more

Pamela Turners Funeral Set As Cop Goes Unpunished

first_imgTurner’s children ripped into the Baytown Police Department during a press conference last week.“My mom is not a horrible person, she’s so loving, she’s so caring,” Rubin said.“My mother was not an evil person, she was not a criminal,” January added. “I won’t stand here and let ya’ll make her look like that… I didn’t receive a phone call. They didn’t want to tell us how things were done or give us any information. I had to sit there and replay this video of my mother getting murdered.”Turner’s death appeared to be the latest evidence that police routinely react to Black and brown suspects vastly different from white ones despite the level of threat posed to officers. That point was proven and then some this week when an “armed and dangerous” white man accused of shooting and killing one police officer while injuring two others in an Alabama trailer park was somehow able to be peacefully arrested.SEE ALSO:Sounds About White! Eric Garner’s Killer Is Using Every Trick In The Book To Delay His TrialMississippi Police Officer Charged With Murdering A 32-Year-Old Black Mother The unarmed grandmother of three who was shot and killed by a police officer in suburban Houston last week was set to be laid to rest on Thursday. Pamela Turner died after Baytown Police Officer Juan Delacruz fired multiple shots at close range following his botched attempt to arrest her for what lawyers described as a false pretense.READ MORE: Will Police Public Executions Of Black People Ever Stop?The 45-year-old’s funeral services were scheduled to take place Thursday morning at Lilly Grove Baptist Church in Houston. Rev. Al Sharpton was slated to give Turner’s eulogy and his National Action Network civil rights organization announced it was paying for the funeral services. More By Bruce C.T. Wright USA, New York, Protesters of police killing march in New York demanding Justice For All The Evolving Relevance Of ‘The Talk’ Everything We Know About Sadie Roberts-Joseph’s Murder Investigation 31 Black Women Who Died In Police Custodycenter_img Baytown Police seemingly tried to blame Turner for her own death, releasing a statement that said she used Delacruz’s Taser against him, purportedly prompting him to fear for his life and shoot her. “During the course of the attempted arrest, the female began struggling with the officer, which forced the officer to deploy his Taser,” Baytown Police Department Lt. Steve Dorris said May 14, the morning after the shooting. “That deployment was not effective, and the female was able to get the officer’s Taser away from him. (She) actually tased the officer, which forced the officer to draw his duty weapon and fire multiple rounds at the suspect.”However, the video of the fatal encounter, recorded by a bystander, did not appear to show Turner reaching for anything. In fact, Turner can be heard on the video telling Delacruz he was harassing her.Despite all of the above, Delacruz was placed on paid administrative leave, a curious status for someone who the county’s medical examiner said definitely committed a “homicide” after he apparently ignored his police training and resorted to lethal force against the unarmed Turner. Adding insult to literal injury was the fact that Delacruz reportedly lived in the same apartment complex and knew Turner, who screamed “I’m pregnant!” in the seconds before she was hot, was suffering from mental illness.“He never gave her any verbal commands,” Crump told the Final Call recently. “There’s nothing on that video that shows that she was a threat to him in any way where he had to use unnecessary, unjustifiable, unimaginable, excessive force like he did in that video when he shot her five times at point blank range while she laid on the ground. It is just the most horrific murder that we’ve ever seen by one of these police officers killing an unarmed Black person, much less, an unarmed Black woman, which makes it all the more reprehensible.” Baytown Police Department , Baytown police shooting , fatal police shooting , Juan Manuel Delacruz , Pamela Turner , Texas The family has sent me a picture of #PamelaTurner . Please share this instead of that mugshot. #BLMHOU #SayHerName pic.twitter.com/QtrJb1rUos— Ashton P. Woods (@AshtonPWoods) May 15, 2019Ben Crump, the civil rights attorney who was representing Turner’s family, was expected to discuss the findings of an independent autopsy during a press conference Wednesday afternoon in Houston alongside other attorneys as well as Turner’s sister, Antoinette Dorsey-James, and her children, Chelsie Rubin and Cameron January.The website of the Harris County Medical Examiner’s office confirmed last week that the “manner of death” for Turner was “homicide.” The primary cause of death was listed as “multiple gunshot wounds.” However, Delacruz has remained gainfully employed by the Baytown Police Department more than a week after the “homicide” that police said he happened when approached her in an apartment complex parking lot because she had outstanding warrants. Crump said last week that was a lie.“The police sought to criminalized [sic] this unarmed #blackwoman who the police officer executed her at 10:40pm on May 13, 2019 in Baytown, Texas, a suburb of Houston, Texas,” Crump tweeted last Thursday morning before Delacruz’s identity had been confirmed. “The Baytown Police Department are lying on #pamelaturner when they say she had outstanding warrants.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMoreShare to EmailEmailEmail Unpacking Mayor Pete’s ‘Douglass Plan’ For Black Americalast_img read more

African American Cowboys in the Wild West

first_imgWhen one imagines the “Wild West” of the 19th century, it is probably the stereotypical imagery of “Cowboys and Indians”. And those cowboys in your head are likely white. But African-American cowboys of the 19th century actually accounted for about one quarter, or 25 percent of workers in the cattle industry between the 1860s and 1880s. According to SmithsonianMag the term “cowboy” is believed to have been a pejorative referring to black workers, while white workers were called “cow hands.” Over time, however, all ranch workers became known as cowboys.Before slavery was abolished, enslaved black ranch hands would have been provided with a relatively high level of freedom compared to other slaves, as they were issued with weapons and left alone with their horses and cattle charges for long periods of time.A cowboy, c. 1887, wearing shotgun style chaps.At the end of the American Civil War, slaves that had been freed were still not allowed to own land in some states, so many headed westward. They continued to work as ranch hands, often for the same wages as their white coworkers, which was unusual for the time.Some even stayed with their former masters as employees. According to historian William Loren Katz, being a cowboy immediately after the civil war was one of the few jobs open to men of color who did not want to work as elevator operators, delivery boys and the like.Willie M. “Bill” Pickett c.1902.Cowboys of all walks of life were in great demand when ranchers started to sell their cattle to the northern states, where beef prices were much higher than in the south. Off the trail, however, black cowboys were still barred from certain hotels or eating establishments, while their crewmates were not.But while African-Americans in much of the United States were still experiencing high degrees of discrimination (a legacy which continues today), life among cowboys themselves was much more egalitarian. Whether black or white, they shared sleeping quarters, if they weren’t all sleeping under the stars, and even blankets.Bill Pickett -“The bull dogger”One of the better-known African-American rodeo cowboys was Bill Pickett. In the 5th grade he left school to become a ranch hand and while working with longhorn cattle, invented the technique of “bulldogging.” Pickett would jump from his horse and literally grab the bull (or cow) by the horns, wrestling it to the ground.With his 4 brothers, Pickett later established the Pickett Brothers Bronco Busters and Rough Riders Association. He then joined the 101 Ranch Wild West Show in 1905, and performed under the pseudonym “The Dusky Demon.” However, his African-American heritage sometimes meant he could not appear in many rodeos, and so he would claim to be of Comanche descent instead.Nat LoveNat Love, an African-American cowboy born into slavery near Nashville, Tennessee, wrote an autobiography of his life on the frontier in 1907.In his memoir, he recalls the great friendship of his fellow ranch hands with much respect and admiration: “A braver, truer set of men never lived than these wild sons of the plain whose home was in the saddle and their couch, mother earth, with the sky for a covering. They were always ready to share their blanket and their last ration with a less fortunate fellow companion and always assisted each other in the many trying situations that were continually coming up in a cowboy’s life.”Bass Reeves.Similarly, Bass Reeves was born a slave in Arkansas in 1838. He later became the first black deputy U.S. Marshall west of the Mississippi River. He is credited with more than 300 arrests, and shot and killed 14 outlaws in self-defense. He often disguised himself to fool lawbreakers, and some believe that he may have been the inspiration behind the fictional character, the Lone Ranger.When practical transportation lines, like rail, came into existence, the need for migrant cattle ranching came to an end, and the zenith of the cowboy with it. Some continued in the new rodeo shows that were becoming popular, including Nat Love, who became known on the Rodeo circuit as “Deadwood Dick.”Edward L. Wheeler. Deadwood Dick, the Prince of the Road; or, The Black Rider of the Black Hills, 1877.Cowboys are still employed today, although not in as great a number as in the 19th century. Cleo Hearn has been a professional cowboy since 1959, and in 1970 became the first African-American cowboy to win a calf-roping competition at a major rodeo.Read another story from us: Cowgirls: The ranchers, pioneers & later rodeo stars, who rode the WestHe has also played a cowboy on TV, in movies, and was the first African-American to portray the Marlboro Man, not to mention he was first to go to college on a rodeo scholarship. Today, he runs his own rodeo group: Cowboys of Color Association, where the settling of the west is portrayed as including a variety of cultures, a fitting legacy for an unexpectedly diverse part of U.S. history.Patricia Grimshaw is a self-professed museum nerd, with an equal interest in both medieval and military history. She received a BA (Hons) from Queen’s University in Medieval History, and an MA in War Studies from the Royal Military College of Canada, and completed a Master of Museum Studies at the University of Toronto before beginning her museum career.last_img read more

US States sue over rule allowing clinicians to refuse abortions

first_imgThe New York suit was brought by Colorado; Connecticut; Delaware; the District of Columbia; Hawaii; Chicago, Cook County and the state of Illinois; Maryland; Massachusetts; Michigan; Minnesota; Nevada; New Jersey; New Mexico; New York City and state; Oregon; Pennsylvania; Rhode Island; Vermont; Virginia; and Wisconsin.A spokesman for federal government lawyers declined to comment on the lawsuit.The city of San Francisco sued over the regulation on May 2, hours after President Donald Trump announced it during a White House Rose Garden speech marking the National Day of Prayer.New York Attorney General Letitia James said the new lawsuit is meant to stop the federal government from “giving health care providers free license to openly discriminate and refuse care to patients.” Advertising Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off Supreme Court notice to Centre on petition seeking to decriminalise abortion Related News A Manhattan federal court lawsuit asked a judge to declare the rule unconstitutional and say it was passed in an arbitrary and capricious manner. In a separate lawsuit in San Francisco federal court, California sued as well, saying there was no evidence that the impact on patients was considered.The California lawsuit said the rule issued by the Department of Health and Human Services creates a broad exemption for any individual, entity or provider to deny patients basic health care, even in emergencies.“A provider can therefore deny service on the basis of a hunch or prejudice, without any supporting evidence, without notifying a supervisor of the denial of service, and without providing notice or alternative options and/or referrals to patients in need,” the lawsuit said. Advertising By AP |New York | Published: May 22, 2019 10:06:51 am Taking stock of monsoon rain She called it a “gross misinterpretation of religious freedom that will have devastating consequences on communities throughout the country.”According to the New York lawsuit, the rule drastically expands the number of health providers who can refuse to provide services, allowing everyone from ambulance drivers to receptionists and customer service representatives at insurance companies to cite the rule. Advertising P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Appeals court puts Trump abortion restrictions on hold again Best Of Express More Explained Pro-choice supporters listen as Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) speaks after holding a roundtable discussion with abortion providers, health experts, pro-choice activists, and state legislators at the Georgia State House in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., May 16, 2019. (REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage)Two dozen states and municipalities sued the federal government Tuesday to stop a new rule that lets health care clinicians decline to provide abortions and other services that conflict with their moral or religious beliefs. The rule is scheduled to take effect in July. San Francisco had previously filed a similar action.The department has said the rule requires hospitals, universities, clinics and other entities that receive federal funding to certify compliance with some 25 federal laws protecting conscience and religious rights.Most laws pertain to medical procedures such as abortion, sterilization and assisted suicide.The department has previously said that past administrations haven’t done enough to protect such rights in the medical field. The lawsuit said the rule conflicts with various state laws requiring health care professionals to carry out certain actions even if they cannot comply with some health-care directives for reasons of conscience. Plea in Supreme Court: Abortion law violative of privacy Post Comment(s)last_img read more

On world stage Trump backs North Koreas scathing criticism of Biden

first_imgTrump spoke during the U.S. Memorial Day weekend, a federal holiday honoring Americans who have died while serving in the armed forces. “Backing ruthless dictators over our allies in the region?” tweeted U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar, a Democratic presidential hopeful. “This does not show American strength: Still angling for a deal, Trump backs Kim Jong Un over Biden, Bolton and Japan.”Trump’s national security adviser, John Bolton, last week said North Korean missile tests had “no doubt” violated U.N. Security Council resolutions. On Monday, Trump alluded to Bolton and said he had a different view.‘DISGRACEFUL’“We’re going to have to retire the word ‘unprecedented’ during Trump’s presidency,” said Larry Sabato, presidential historian and director of the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics.“It’s becoming the new normal. And disgraceful, of course,” he wrote on Twitter. “Joe Biden was a disaster, his administration with President Obama, they were basically a disaster when it came to so many things, whether it was economy, whether it was military … no matter what it was, they had a lot of problems,” Trump said when asked about criticism that he was favoring Kim over the former vice president.“So, I’m not a fan.”A commentary by North Korea’s KCNA state media on Tuesday slammed Biden for “rhetoric slandering the supreme leadership of the DPRK (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea).” Trump ‘walked the talk’ in pressuring Pak to end terrorism: Indian envoy to US Advertising Trump secures billion dollar deal to eradicate AIDS from US in a decade Best Of Express Taking stock of monsoon rain More Explained ‘They gave you Nobel for what?’ clueless Trump asks Yazidi activist Nadia Murad Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies “Well, Kim Jong Un made a statement that Joe Biden is a low IQ individual. He probably is, based on his record. I think I agree with him on that,” Trump told a news conference in Tokyo.Trump’s comments on the world stage reinforced a tweet that he sent on Saturday with a similar message and drew renewed criticism of the president back home. North Korea’s state-run news agency issued a stinging attack last week on Biden, who has been critical of the isolated state.Trump has targeted Biden with increasing criticism as the former vice president rises in polls for the Democratic presidential nomination to challenge the Republican Trump in the November 2020 election campaign. The president often derides his political opponents, but his tweet on Sunday and his comments on Monday were notable because he issued them while abroad, a practice traditionally shunned in U.S. politics, and aligned himself with Kim, considered a brutal dictator by many. Advertising By Reuters |Tokyo | Updated: May 28, 2019 8:08:47 am donald trump, joe biden, barack obama, north korea, former us vice president, tokyo, kim jong un, us memorial day, world news, indian express Joe Biden and Donald Trump. (File Photo)US President Donald Trump on Monday publicly endorsed North Korea’s scathing personal attack on former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, dismissing criticism that he was siding with a foreign dictator over a fellow American. Related News Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 One of Trump’s fellow Republicans, U.S. Representative Adam Kinzinger, called out the president on Sunday for “praising a dictator” and attacking Biden over the Memorial Day weekend.“It’s just plain wrong,” Kinzinger, a military veteran, said on Twitter.Biden’s campaign and the Democratic National Committee did not immediately respond to requests for comment.Pete Buttigieg, a Democratic candidate for president and Navy veteran, was also critical on Monday. “Kim Jong Un is a murderous dictator and Vice President Biden served this country honorably. It’s just one more example, though, of the way that this president tries to draw attention to himself by saying things that shock the conscience …”Trump has sought to build a strong relationship with the North Korean leader in the hope that North Korea would agree to denuclearize. Trump also knocked Biden and former President Barack Obama on Monday for their efforts to prevent Iran from getting a nuclear weapon. Trump pulled the United States out of a nuclear deal Iran sealed with Washington and other foreign powers. Advertising “What he uttered is just sophism of an imbecile bereft of elementary quality as a human being, let alone a politician,” the North Korean news agency said. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Frances decadeold effort to slash pesticide use failed Will a new attempt

first_img Other Other Mikael Fremont was up to his shoulders in rapeseed, looking pleased. The bright yellow flowers had faded, giving way to long slender pods that would yield valuable canola oil, as well as protein meal for livestock. While his spaniel darted about the farm here in May, the burly 41-year-old grower wanted to point out something nearly hidden: a mat of tattered, dead leaves covering the soil.Months earlier, Fremont had planted this vetch and clover along with the rapeseed. The two legumes had grown rapidly, preventing weeds from crowding out the emerging rapeseed and guarding it from hungry beetles and weevils. As a result, Fremont had cut by half the herbicide and insecticide he sprayed. The technique of mixing plant species in a single field had worked “perfectly,” he said.This innovative approach is just one of many practices, now spreading across France, that could help farmers achieve an elusive national goal. In 2008, the French government announced a dramatic shift in agricultural policy, calling for pesticide use to be slashed in half. And it wanted to hit that target in just a decade. No other country with as large and diverse an agricultural system had tried anything so ambitious. The goal “was very revolutionary,” says Henriette Christensen of the Pesticide Action Network in Brussels, especially because France is the second largest consumer of pesticides in Europe. But France’s overall use of chemical pest control went up. Many factors contributed, analysts say. Taxes on chemicals, for example, weren’t high enough to influence buying decisions. It was difficult to persuade some farmers to adopt new practices or technologies that might add to their costs or decrease yields. Ecophyto’s funding—about €70 million a year since 2016—was too low and “out of all proportion to the challenge,” France’s inspector general concluded late last year. And market forces, such as high prices for cereals, may have created an incentive to spray more chemicals to protect unusually lucrative harvests.Yet veterans of Ecophyto aren’t discouraged. On many farms, analysts say, it appears that existing technologies and practices alone could cut chemical use by at least 20%. “Without underestimating the extent of the challenge, there are reasons to be optimistic,” says Alain Tridon, director of the Ministry of Agriculture’s plant health services in Paris.One source of that optimism can be found on the Ducourt Estate, 450 hectares of rolling vineyards in Ladaux, France, that produces about 3 million bottles of wine each year. In a long garage, massive four-wheeled tractor-sprayers stand 3 meters tall. Each carries a 2200-liter tank for fungicide. Their articulated arms, studded with nozzles, can spray chemicals on four rows of grapes in one pass, killing mildew and other plant pathogens.Winemakers are France’s biggest users of fungicides, although most are based on sulfur and copper, rather than more toxic synthetic molecules. Still, the sight of Ducourt’s yellow beasts trundling through the vineyards can unnerve estate neighbors worried about farm chemicals, says Jeremy Ducourt, who helps manage the family owned business. The machines are actually “a big part of the solution,” he says. That’s because they helped the estate reduce its use of fungicides by about 30%, thanks to nozzles that put more fungicide on the plant and less on the ground. The most advanced sprayers even collect and reuse any lingering mist.Similar high-efficiency sprayers are available for other crops, and just replacing older models with newer machines could make a dent in France’s chemical use. But upgrades don’t come cheap. The Ducourt Estate’s sprayers, which double as harvesters, cost about €320,000. Add the fact that only 3% of the nation’s 200,000 sprayers are replaced each year, and it could take decades to fully upgrade the fleet. 10–12 Vineyards The Ducourt family has also cut fungicide by using decision support software. The program draws on timely weather, surveillance, and other information, such as the size of leaves, to advise when to spray. The tool can reduce fungicide use by about 20% in vineyards, and cereal growers have seen similar results. But such tools haven’t yet spread to all farms. Potato farmers, who also spray copious fungicides, now use the tools on about half of their fields, but aim to increase that share to 90% within 5 years.When it comes to insects, it’s much more difficult for software to predict outbreaks in fields. So, farmers must diligently scout their fields so that they can apply insecticides before pests multiply out of control. Ecophyto 2+ aims to boost a noninsecticide approach called biocontrol. In this long-standing approach, farmers confuse pests with pheromones, for example, or seek to reduce populations by introducing the pest’s natural predators. Advocates highlight the strategy’s success in France’s ample fields of maize. There, a tiny introduced parasitic wasp called Trichogramma brassicae has become a key weapon against the corn rootworm, a major pest. The wasps lay their eggs inside the eggs of the rootworms, shrinking populations just as effectively as insecticides when conditions are optimal.The wasps are not a panacea. Although the costs are roughly comparable to insecticides, more labor is required to hang the cardboard cartons holding the wasps on maize plants. And insecticides remain more popular in southern France, where maize farmers face multiple pests the wasps don’t attack. (In other nations, maize farmers control pests with less insecticide by planting genetically modified plants, but engineered crops are not allowed in France.) Despite such limitations, the wasps are now used on 23% of maize hectares where rootworms pose a threat. Antoine Messéan, French National Agricultural Research Institute Tons per year 1 Since then, the French government has spent nearly half a billion euros on implementing the plan, called Ecophyto. It created a network of thousands of farms that test methods of reducing chemical use, improved national surveillance of pests and plant diseases, and funded research on technologies and techniques that reduce pesticide use. It has imposed taxes on farm chemicals in a bid to decrease sales, and even banned numerous pesticides, infuriating many farmers.The effort has helped quench demand on some farms. Overall, however, Ecophyto has failed miserably. Instead of declining, national pesticide use has increased by 12%, largely mirroring a rise in farm production. “We lost 10 years since 2008,” says François Veillerette of Générations Futures, an environmental advocacy organization in Paris. “We can’t afford to waste 10 more.”The French government agrees. Officials are now finalizing a revised plan dubbed Ecophyto 2+. It will boost research, add demonstration farms, increase taxes on pesticides, and prohibit more compounds. President Emmanuel Macron has even urged a ban of glyphosate, the world’s best-selling weed killer and an important tool for many farmers.Details of the revised plan, including funding levels, are still being decided. But some observers are already skeptical. Farmers fear burdensome rules and increased costs that will put them at a competitive disadvantage. Environmental organizations worry France will again fall short. “There are good ideas,” says Carmen Etcheverry, formerly of France Nature Environnement in Paris. “But we don’t know how they will be implemented.”There is also optimism. Despite Ecophyto’s failure, it showed farmers have powerful options, such as mixing crops, planting new varieties, and tapping data analysis systems that help identify the best times to spray. With the right incentives and support, those tools might make a bigger difference this time around. And the fact that France isn’t backing away from its ambitious goal inspires many observers. “You feel,” says Robert Finger, an agricultural economist at ETH Zurich in Switzerland, “that something vivid is going on.” 0.75 Winemaking is an art, but it couldn’t happen in France without a lot of chemistry. The battle against two major diseases—powdery mildew and downy mildew—means vineyards account for about 14% of all pesticide sales nationwide. “If I don’t spray, I don’t have grapes,” says Jeremy Ducourt, who helps manage his family’s 450-hectare Ducourt Estate in Ladaux.Many estates are adapting their practices to reduce spraying. But Ducourt and a few others are also counting on the grapes for help. In 2014, Ducourt persuaded his family to plant a few hectares of two varieties, bred in Switzerland, that carry mildew-resistance genes added from wild relatives in North America and Asia. With this genetic protection, the vines require 80% to 90% less spraying.The new breeds aren’t perfect; branches can be brittle and the mildew resistance is only partial. But that didn’t stop Ducourt from planting an additional two varieties of resistant vines this spring.Even better vines are on the way. After decades of work, French plant breeders are testing grapes with more durable resistance to mildew. “It is a major breakthrough,” says Francois Delmotte, a plant pathologist with the French National Agricultural Research Institute in Bordeaux, France, who leads an effort to monitor resistance efficacy. Breeders are now fine-tuning the vines to the regional needs of growers. Introductions could be slow, because growers replace just 3% of the long-lived grapevines each year.Vintners also face marketing headaches. Ducourt, for example, must sell wine made from their resistant grapes as table wine, which fetches a lower price than bottles labeled as coming from Bordeaux. The grapes have not yet been officially recognized by a body that regulates France’s wine growers. Many growers won’t plant the new grapes until that official blessing is granted. But Ducourt isn’t too worried. It’s just part of the burden, he says, of being a pioneer. 0 Herbicide 0 12–14 Germany Rapeseed 0.25 Three-year averagesPesticide intensity by crop Pesticide use grew under Ecophyto 60,748 After World War II, synthetic herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides greatly boosted French farmers’ harvests and profits. But the chemicals contaminated groundwater, lakes, and streams, and they harmed farm workers and wildlife. Consumers became wary, and by the 1970s public opposition to pesticides was growing.During the 2000s, pesticide sales fell as farmers applied them with increasing efficiency and sometimes switched to more effective compounds that required smaller doses. But the ambition to do much better crystalized in 2007, when then–French President Nicolas Sarkozy convened a conference to set a 5-year environmental agenda. Ecophyto was the result, negotiated between environmentalists, farm unions, pesticidemakers, and others. It included a major political concession; the 50% cut would be reached “if possible,” which meant that much of the plan was voluntary.Still, Ecophyto served as a catalyst. Research funds were targeted at evaluating smarter ways to use pesticides. Approaches were tested on some 3000 farms that joined a demonstration network. Officials recruited observers around the country to scout for pests and plant diseases and provide weekly reports; the surveillance helps farmers decide when spraying might be a waste of resources. On average, farms in the demonstration network decreased their pesticide use by 18%, and most did it without sacrificing profits. Potato 0 40Average number of treatments per year 09–11 DUCOURT Cherries Fungicide (GRAPHIC) N. DESAI/SCIENCE; (DATA) EUROSTAT 200 Italy By Erik Stokstad Email France’s decade-old effort to slash pesticide use failed. Will a new attempt succeed? Insecticide Sugarbeets 1 .5 Disease-resistant grapes helped vintner Jeremy Ducourt cut fungicide use. 2.5 You cannot reduce pesticides if you don’t convince cooperatives that they should change their business model. In French fields of rapeseed, seen here in flower, planting companion crops is reducing the need to spray weed killers and insecticides. 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Country 20 France’s pesticide challenge The use of pesticides (bottom) is most concentrated in a few growing regions (top) and certain crops (middle). Soft wheat Herbicide Sugarbeet GERARD SIOEN/GAMMA-RAPHO VIA GETTY IMAGES 0 Insecticide Fungicide 13–15 Related story Vive la resistant vines! The mixed crop technique used by Fremont in his fields of rapeseed demonstrates another use of biology, in this case to control weeds. It’s the kind of ancient technique that used to be commonplace. In August, one or more fast-growing legumes are planted between the rows of rapeseed. There’s enough space that the legumes don’t steal too much water or light, but they keep down weeds and, as a bonus, release nitrogen, a fertilizer. They also seem to minimize insect attacks, although this benefit hasn’t been conclusively demonstrated. By the time frost kills the legumes, the rapeseed has grown thick enough that few weeds can challenge it.Such mixed cropping “is becoming very popular,” says Marie-Hélène Jeuffroy, an agronomist with the French National Agricultural Research Institute (INRA) in Versailles. Nationwide, 3% to 5% of France’s rapeseed hectares are now coplanted with legumes. That share could grow to 30% by 2030 under a pledge made in July by the French federation of oilseed producers.One French seed company—Jouffray Drillaud, based in Cisse—sees enough potential in crop mixtures that 2 years ago it stopped selling herbicides, which generated 20% of its revenue. “When you have more diversity, you have more resilience,” says Vincent Béguier, R&D director of the firm, which now focuses its weed control on mixed cropping and other nonchemical approaches. “Simplicity is the worst thing for agriculture.”So far, rapeseed growers appear to be reaping the biggest benefits in weed control from mixed cropping. But scientists are searching for other possibilities. Jeuffroy and other participants in ReMIX, a new €5 million research collaboration among 13 European countries, are studying how to optimize mixtures, measure benefits, and remove obstacles to mixed cropping.France’s Ministry of Agriculture is moving to encourage greener approaches by requiring pesticide retailers to inform farmers about 36 alternatives to spraying. Instead of only touting insecticides to kill pests, for example, a dealer might recommend a crop mixture, or traps baited with sexual pheromones to confuse male insects, interfering with reproduction. The goal is to reduce the number of pesticide doses they sell by 20% by 2021. Dealers that miss the goal could face penalties.To reach Ecophyto’s goal of a 50% cut, however, many farmers will need to make more use of another practice—crop rotation. Alternating what’s planted in a field, ideally over 5 or 6 years, is among the most effective ways to fight weeds, soil-borne pests and diseases. Switching between peas, wheat, and sugar beets, for example, can prevent pathogens from building up in the soil year after year, while swapping in a pasture grass hinders annual weeds.Although simple in concept, it can be hard to increase the diversity of crops in rotation. That’s because the whole system is locked: Farmers in many regions have specialized in certain crops—such as wheat or potatoes—and rely on finely tuned methods to produce high yields. There is often no nearby market for additional crops, because storage and processing facilities also tend to specialize in dominant crops—as do researchers, advisers, and policymakers. “Everything has been organized around major crops with high use of inputs,” says Antoine Messéan, an agronomist with INRA. “It’s difficult to get out of this self-reinforcing mechanism.”Crop diversification is not a top priority in the new version of the Ecophyto plan, but the Ministry of Agriculture has asked INRA for advice on how to encourage it. In a related effort, France hopes to double the amount of organic farming, which does not allow synthetic pesticides, to 15% of hectares by 2022. In May, the Ministry of Agriculture announced it will spend €1.1 billion to support organic expansion. 0.5 Maize 66,798 72,818 Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Km (GRAPHIC) N. DESAI/SCIENCE; (DATA, TOP TO BOTTOM) NATIONAL BANK OF DISTRIBUTOR SALES (BNV-D), TREATMENT: MINISTRY FOR AN ECOLOGICAL AND INCLUSIVE TRANSITION; BNV-D, TREATMENT: MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE AND FOOD; MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE 10 3 million kg When you have more diversity, you have more resilience. The government also faces growing pressure from environmentalists to ban more farm chemicals. The approach is controversial, and farmers complain that greener alternatives aren’t always available. After an insecticide called dimethoate was banned in France in 2016, for instance, cherry growers had no effective way to fight an invasive fruit fly, says Eric Thirouin, deputy secretary general at the National Federation of Farmers’ Unions in Paris. Meanwhile, the insecticide remains legal in Spain and Italy, he notes, putting French cherry growers at a disadvantage.In other cases, banning one chemical can cause the use of others to spike, undermining reduction efforts. French wheat growers, for example, relied on neonicotinoids, which are coated on seeds, to protect the plants against aphids and leaf hoppers. Now that they are banned, some growers might increase applications of other insecticides. And there are other kinds of trade-offs. Some specialists fear banning the weed killer glyphosate could increase erosion or greenhouse gas emissions, if farmers start to till the soil to remove weeds. More research on such trade-offs is “urgently needed,” Finger says.In the meantime, it will be crucial to enlist France’s farmer-owned cooperatives in making Ecophyto 2+ a success, observers say. French farming is dominated by a handful of these enormous agri-businesses. They buy and trade harvests, and most sell their members seeds, fertilizer, and pesticides. “You cannot reduce pesticides if you don’t convince cooperatives that they should change their business model,” Messéan says. A few have made strides in this direction, such as Terrena, the €5 billion cooperative headquartered near Ancenis that encouraged Fremont to adopt crop mixtures.Although the majority of French farmers largely ignored or resisted Ecophyto, they are now showing signs of support. In July, more than 40 farmer organizations issued a “Contract for Solutions” that included pledges to reach specific reduction goals. The pledges represent a turning point, says Thirouin, as farm groups are no longer focused just on fighting pesticide bans. “The idea was to step aside from this defensive position and be proactive,” he says. Tridon also sees it as a positive step. “We are really seeing a shift in mindset.”It’s not only farmers who will have to adjust if France is to meet its ambitious goals. Reducing the cost of food production to the environment and public health will likely increase the cost to consumers and taxpayers. “Everything is possible,” says Eugénia Pommaret, director of the Union of Plant Protection Industries, a pesticide trade group in Paris. “It’s just a question of costs.”The key to change will be collaboration among all the players in the food system, adds Florence Leprince, an agronomist at Arvalis, a technical institute for arable crops in Montardon, France. “Solutions exist, but they are far from covering all the needs,” she says. “It’s more about increasing the commitment of everyone to change the way of producing.” 11–13 2 0 Millions of unit doses Appleslast_img read more

Iraqi forces begin operation against IS along Syrian border

first_img Advertising “We press on the hands of our heroic forces that will achieve victory with the will of its heroes against the gangs of Daesh,” said Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi using an Arabic acronym to refer to IS. “May God protect you and make you victorious.”IS once held large parts of Syria and Iraq where it declared a caliphate in 2014. The extremists lost in March the last territory they controlled in Syria. In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home By AP |Baghdad | Published: July 7, 2019 4:25:41 pm Advertising Post Comment(s) Although Iraq declared victory against IS in July 2017, the extremists have turned into an insurgency and have carried out deadly attacks in the country.The military said the operation that began at sunrise was being carried out by Iraqi troops and members of the Popular Mobilization Forces that largely consist of Iran-backed militias.It said the operation will last several days and was the first phase of the Will of Victory Operation securing the western province of Anbar and the central and northern regions of Salahuddin and Nineveh. Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Iraq news, car bomb explosion in Iraq, car bomb attack in Iraq, Bomb attack in Iraq, violence in Iraq, Latest news, World news, international news, world affairs, Although Iraq declared victory against IS in July 2017, the extremists have turned into an insurgency and have carried out deadly attacks in the country. (Representational Image/AP Photo)Iraq’s security and paramilitary forces began Sunday a military operation along the border with Syria aimed at clearing the area of Islamic State group militants, the military said in a statement. Top News last_img read more