Month: June 2021

  • Novocastrians Ladies – Team of the Month (May 2011 issue)

    first_imgWe’re after a March Team of the Month, an award for junior clubs in Europe. To enter, email alan_pearey @ipcmedia.com.Check out April 2011’s Team of the MonthThis article appeared in the May 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine. To find a newsagent which sells Rugby World in UK visit http://www.ipcmedia.com/availability/index.php?code=rugby LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS BEING A women’s rugby team in Newcastle’s football hotbed requires a special resilience. And when Novocastrians Ladies lost several key figures in pre-season – some to the baby boom, others, like England A’s Emily Braund, to a distant job – that roll-your-sleeves-up doggedness was needed to save the club.Fears that they’d be unable to field a side were allayed by a recruitment drive that included new links with Newcastle University. With new coaches Chris Fife and David Addison at her side, skipper Janette Shaw – the England Women team manager – vowed not only to find fresh talent but to power the ‘Panthers’ towards a third promotion in four years.It is, almost, mission accomplished. They ended February with seven straight wins in RFUW Championship North Two, their chief rivals, Morpeth, having yielded 34-0 when the sides met in October. A points tally of 157-3 emphasises the impact made by a dominant pack and veteran back-line (average age mid-30s) that features the discovery of the season in ex-footballer Helen Kane, an impenetrable last line of defence. “She’s a police officer so isn’t scared of anyone,” says lock and club nominator Andrea Lee. Kate Disley, an eight/nine, has also been a revelation.And what of those three leaked points, a penalty v Fleetwood? “That was our prop, Alice Workman. She wanted a breather and lay all over the ball. We fine her every week for it!”Training attracts turnouts of 30-plus, match days bring an expectant buzz, and there have been car washes and home-made cupcakes galore as people pitch in to raise funds for the finale at Isle of Man side Vagabonds.Canterbury KitbagsA keener bunch we can’t imagine. The Panthers are our Team of the Month and win 22 Canterbury kitbags.center_img For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipc Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.last_img read more

  • Tried and tested players should be picked – Toby Booth

    first_imgST ALBANS, ENGLAND – MAY 24: Matt Stevens scrummages during the Saracens training session held at the Saracens training ground on May 24, 2011 in St Albans, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Ultimately you would be happier as an England fan if the World Cup was another 12 months away because you would see an even greater group of England players by then, but they will go to New Zealand with great confidence.This article appeared in the July 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit Stevens possesses an unfaultered work ethicWhen England name their World Cup squad I don’t expect there to be any untried young players in the 30, writes London Irish Director of Rugby Toby Booth. If you’re going to a World Cup as a player, you’re going to play. It’s all very well fast-tracking people but you can’t afford the luxury of someone who isn’t a certainty, and Martin Johnson will be looking at tried-and-tested people.Lots to consider before SeptemberEven so, some good young talents emerged this season. Jonathan Joseph really kicked on at my club, London Irish, and scored a lot of tries and he was still under 20. George Lowe at Harlequins has been exceptionally good, Joe Simpson at Wasps has had a good season, as has Nick Wood at Gloucester.Manu Tuilagi is another young player who’s done exceptionally well. He creates havoc with the ball in hand and the future of the Tuilagi dynasty at Leicester looks assured! I’m sure he’s very disappointed about the finale of it all, as he was banned for five weeks for punching Chris Ashton, but he’s a young man who will have to learn by his mistakes. Whether I think his ban is right or not, that’s what he got! The entry points are there for different levels of offence and if they’re consistently applied, that’s fine.There are players who have come through difficult circumstances to succeed this season, like Matt Stevens and Topsy Ojo, who had 14 months out injured, then scored ten league tries. Time out often refreshes people’s ambition and desire. Matt Stevens has shown extreme resilience to come back from his drugs ban. I take my hat off to him. He’s put himself back into a healthy lifestyle and is playing exceptionally well and he’s one who will be on the shortlist to go to the World Cup. I don’t know where he sits in the pecking order but with a 22-man match squad you need props who can play both sides like he can.The Aviva Premiership was a more interesting place this season with Exeter bringing a new freshness to it. The new law interpretations made the game a better spectacle and there’s a better balance between attack and defence. There are still issues over the scrum, which must be resolved because scrum ball is the best attacking ball to play with. We have to look at the consistency of approach, not just from the referees but from the RFU and players and coaches too. We need to think outside the box.On the negative side, everyone was a bit surprised about Wasps’ demise. They were fifth when they changed their director of rugby (Tony Hanks left on 17 February) and they then slipped to ninth (they won seven matches out of 14 before Hanks left and two out of eight afterwards). There’s major upheaval going on at Sale too. There is lots of evolution and change. It’s a very exciting time now. The World Cup will be a fantastic test for England and there’s no pressure on them. Martin Johnson and his coaches will be pleased with what’s gone on this year. They’ve fast-tracked experience into a number of young players. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

  • Future Faces – Matt Kvesic and Paddy Jackson

    first_imgIreland Under 20 Headshots 24/1/2011 Paddy JacksonMandatory Credit ©INPHO/James Crombie Matt Kvesic(England U20)England U20 – Matt KvesicConfidence is a commodity that shouldn’t be underestimated in sport. It’s not a skill or technique that can be taught, but usually comes as a result of a string of good performances and victories. Back-rower Matt Kvesic, 19, was involved in two successful teams last season. Worcester lost just two games on their way back to the Premiership, while England U20 won a Six Nations Grand Slam before heading off to Italy for the Junior World Championship. And Kvesic made his mark in both sides.A regular for Worcester in their title-winning XV, Kvesic’s work-rate, ball-carrying and tackling impressed the Warriors and England coaches, and he was named Young Player of the Year at Sixways. Kvesic was born to English parents in Germany, where his dad Mark, an Army rugby player, had been posted. In November 2009 he became the youngest Warrior in the pro era when facing the Scarlets in the LV= Cup and last season he marked his first full Championship match with two tries against Esher.“Kvesic is a modern back-row who can play six or eight,” says England U20 coach Rob Hunter. “Playing in the Championship was very beneficial to him. His lineout has improved a lot, and there could be a lot more to come from him.”Having led England U18, Kvesic became a fixture for the U20s this year – making a try-scoring debut against Wales – and he captained the side for the first time in their win over Scotland in Treviso in June.Rugby World Verdict: This all-action back-rower should graduate to full England honours. Bea Asprey Paddy Jackson(Ireland U20) Leinster/Ulster played their rivals off the pitch, winning 68-0, and fly-half Paddy Jackson, just 18 at the time, was the star of the show. Not only was his kicking display nervelessly solid but he kept a cool head in front of a big crowd.Jackson’s composure is just one of the reasons why he stood out last season, and he’s also a real threat in attack. He’s quick to exploit gaps in the opposition defence, and never shirks away from a tackle.These attributes haven’t been lost on the national selectors, and Jackson featured in every game of Ireland’s U20 Six Nations campaign this year before heading to Italy for the Junior World Championship. He also made his Magners League debut for Ulster in the 18-16 away victory over the Scarlets in February, filling in for the injured Ian Humphreys, and once again it was notable how quickly he settled into the big occasion.“He’s very attack-minded and his passing and decision-making are both first class,” says Ireland U20 coach Mike Ruddock of Jackson. “His kicking is a few per cent off being top drawer yet, but he’s a brave lad and that will improve. He’s an old-fashioned player with his own style, and has good instincts.”Rugby World Verdict: The future of Ulster and Ireland looks bright with Jackson in it. Bea AspreyThis article appeared in the August 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ireland U20 – Paddy JacksonThe first game at the brand-new Aviva Stadium in Dublin last July involved players from all four Irish provinces, as a Leinster/Ulster team took on Munster/Connacht in a great showcase for Irish rugby. It was also a great opportunity for youngsters to grace the big stage. Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visitlast_img read more

  • Exeter v London Irish live stream: How to watch from anywhere

    first_img Exeter v London Irish live stream: How to watch the Premiership match online from anywhereTop spot is guaranteed for Exeter and they’ve qualified for their first ever European Champions Cup final. Things are going well, eh?So Don Armand leads a home side that has rung the changes, with London Irish in town. Stu Townsend makes his first appearance since February at nine and Phil Dollman gets a run out – he will be saying goodbye at the end of the season. For Irish, Harry Elrington, Matt Cornish and Ollie Hoskins make up the front-row, and academy products Ollie Hassell-Collins, Ben Loader and Tom Homer make up the back three.Exeter Chiefs: Phil Dollman; Facundo Cordero, Tom Hendrickson, Ollie Devoto, Olly Woodburn; Harvey Skinner, Stu Townsend, Billy Keast, Jack Innard, Marcus Street, Will Witty, Tom Price, Richard Capstick, Don Armand (captain), Aaron Hinkley.Replacements: Elvis Taione, James Kenny, Alfie Petch, Dave Dennis, Charlie Wright, Sam Maunder, Jack Walsh, Corey Baldwin.London Irish: Tom Homer; Ben Loader, Curtis Rona, Phil Cokanasiga, Ollie Hassell-Collins; Paddy Jackson, Ben Meehan, Harry Elrington, Matt Cornish, Ollie Hoskins, George Nott, Sebastian de Chaves, Matt Rogerson (captain), Ben Donnell, Albert Tuisue.Replacements: Agustin Creevy, Will Goodrick-Clarke, Lovejoy Chawatama, Chunya Munga, Jack Cooke, Nick Phipps, Theo Brophy Clews, James Stokes.How to watch Exeter v London Irish from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Premiership coverage, like Exeter v London Irish, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Premiership live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPNExeter v London Irish live stream: How to watch from the UKExeter v London Irish, which kicks off at 5.30 on Wednesday 30 September, will be shown live on BT Sport Extra 2 in the UK. If you don’t have a BT contract but want to watch the match, don’t worry because you can still easily watch it online. Reliable man: Ollie Devoto starts for Chiefs (Getty Images) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. That’s because BT Sport has a contract-free monthly pass that allows you to get instant access to all four of their sport channels for just £25.That’s great value given they are showing every Premiership match played behind closed doors live and will also be covering the European Champions and Challenge Cup knockout stages in September and October. Plus, you can cancel at any time because there’s no contract.Get a BT Sport Monthly PassIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when Exeter v London Irish takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Exeter v London Irish live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, the official broadcaster of Premiership matches is NBC, with matches streamed on NBC Sports Gold so you can watch them anytime and anywhere.Exeter v London Irish will kick off at 11.30am EST and 8.30am on the West Coast.The NBC Sports Gold Pass for rugby is $79.99 and includes coverage of the Gallagher Premiership, European Champions and Challenge Cups, and Guinness Six Nations.Exeter v London Irish live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIt’s little wonder that Sky Sport NZ, with ten sports channels, including one dedicated to rugby, is the rights-holder for Premiership matches in New Zealand.If you want to tune in to Exeter v London Irish from the Land of the Long White Cloud, the match kicks off at 4.30am on Thursday on Sky Sport NZ Select.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 30 September 2020 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offerWe recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

  • Hugo Keenan scores double on Ireland debut

    first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. The Leinster winger was among the tries in Ireland’s hefty win Ireland debutant Hugo Keenan was at the double as Six Nations action resumed, with the home side hammering Italy 50-17.There were seven tries in total for Ireland and they won with a bonus point. They now head to Paris with their fate in their own hands – win with a bonus point against France next week, they are guaranteed the Six Nations title. It may still come down to points difference, which means the Irish could yet rue conceded tries here, including a late one from Italian newbie Paolo Garbisi…Italy were overrun for large part of the game and struggled in the face of Ireland’s savage defence. When Ireland eventually earnt their try bonus with a score from openside Will Connors – who was exceptional on debut himself and was named man of the match – the pressure was off. From there Ireland played with width and ambition, including an incredible pass from Peter O’Mahony to set up Bundee Aki’s score. Keenan certainly offered some excitement. He scored two and had a third chalked off – that one was created by a breaking Jacob Stockdale, however James Ryan was adjudged to have blocked Marco Lazzaroni’s path to a tackle on the full-back, leading to referee Matt Carley saying ‘no try’.  Talking before this Test, Ireland attack coach Mike Catt said of Keenan: “He’s unbelievably quick, unbelievably fit, and he’s settled in very, very well. So I see huge things for him, he’s got a huge future.”And immediately after the game, former Ireland centre Gordon D’Arcy told ITV: “I think they’ll need to check his GPS data – he was everywhere.” Ireland scored through CJ Stander, Keenan twice, Connors, Johnny Sexton, Aki and Dave Heffernan. Edo Padovani raced ahead from an interception off Sexton to score a try against the run of play and then Garbisi dummied his way for an 82-minute try at the end. Ireland had in fact rushed the conversion from Heffernan’s score in order to squeeze in more play before the final whistle, to try pile up a bigger points difference, but in the end it backfired as Garbisi shortened the deficit. Could points difference be key in Paris? It should make for an exciting finale. Super debut: Hugo Keenan scores for Ireland (Getty Images) last_img read more

  • Who Are ITV’s Six Nations Pundits?

    first_imgWho will be providing punditry as part of ITV’s coverage of the 2021 Six Nations? Let’s take a look In terms of punditry, ITV have an impressive list of names providing their insights and knowledge. Jonny Wilkinson and Lawrence Dallaglio join their 2003 World Cup-winning coach Sir Clive Woodward as part of the presentation team.Another World Cup winner, former England and Saracens star Maggie Alphonsi, will also be in the studio to give her opinions and views of the action.There are legends of Irish, Scottish and Welsh rugby involved too, including Grand Slam winners Gareth Thomas and Shane Williams, former Ireland captains Brian O’Driscoll and Rory Best, and ex-Scotland lock Jim Hamilton.Former France flanker Serge Betsen and Italy centre Michele Campagnaro are also involved.During the tournament, ITV also produce a Six Nations podcast with Flats & Shanks – David Flatman and Tom Shanklin. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door. Who Are ITV’s Six Nations Pundits?All the matches from the 2021 Six Nations will be televised on either BBC or ITV channels depending on the team playing at home. Wales, Scotland and France home games will be televised on BBC whereas England, Ireland and Italy home matches will be shown on ITV.ITV have a strong line-up of pundits who will present, commentate and give their opinions on the action on the pitch in the 2021 championship. Below we take a look at who they are.Related: 2021 Six Nations TV CoverageWho Are ITV’s Six Nations Pundits?Mark Pougatch, Jill Douglas and Martin Bayfield present the television coverage for ITV with Nick Mullins and Miles Harrison providing commentary. Bayfield and Gabriel Clarke will also present from the sidelines.ITV also have a selection of co-commentators, including former Scotland international Scott Hastings, ex-England prop David Flatman and World Cup winner Danielle Waterman.center_img Key Insight: Wilkinon, Woodward and Dallaglio will all give their thoughts on the tournament (Getty Images) Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

  • Anglicans meet in London during the Olympics

    first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Anglican Communion Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Anglicans meet in London during the Olympics Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN center_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group [Anglican Communion News Service] St. John’s Church in Stratford is working in partnership with local and international churches and groups to host a series of Olympics-related events to celebrate of the London 2012 sporting tournament.Anglicans from around the world have been attending a series of events across churches in London’s district of Stratford (also the location for the Olympic Park) since July 27 to celebrate the 2012 Olympic Games.The initiative, called ‘Ultimate Gold’, is a joint venture designed to encourage churches to mobilize their members and use their buildings to welcome the many thousands of visitors to Stratford, and to help the local people celebrate the Games.St. John’s Church, main host for the scheme and part of the local Stratford Churches initiative, has teamed up with around 18 other churches and groups across the Diocese of London and arranged a variety of different activities for visitors. These have taken place in the churchyard and have so far included children’s activities, free refreshments, a Prayer Zone, classical music concerts, worship services and performances from Christian entertainers from around the world – such as a Brazilian arts company and an urban dance crew from Paris.The Stratford Churches have also been working alongside Christian organizations at a regional and national level to encourage their congregations to get a feel for the 2012 Games. They have partnered with groups such as Through Faith Missions (TFM), Open Air Campaigners (OAC) and Youth with a Mission (YWAM). Visits and performances from Christian entertainers (like the ones mentioned above) were arranged in conjunction with More Than Gold and Share Jesus International and have been taking place across the country.On an international level, St. John’s Church has also been quite proactive. Home to a multicultural congregation (with around 50 different nationalities represented in its membership) and ideally situated — approximately a mile away from the main Olympic Stadium in Stratford — St John’s has so far welcomed people from a range of nationalities.“We have had a reasonable number of Anglicans from around the world visiting the church so far due to the Olympics,” said the Rev. David Richards, vicar of St. John’s Church since 1990. “The main country has been Kenya because Kenya House has been based in Stratford and we hosted a Kenya Emphasis Night last Saturday.”St. John’s Church has also acted as the official hospitality center for the worldwide Anglican Communion, which according to Richards has helped to “reinforce the international nature of the Anglican Church.” A display, highlighting the work of the Anglican Communion as part of the Ultimate Gold program, has been available to the public.The church has been preparing for the Olympics since the day of the announcement in 2005, and has to date mobilized more than a hundred church members from many different countries to think about ways to engage with their surrounding culture.“Jesus told us to go into the world; now the world is coming to us. We have always had an open door to the local community and to passers-by, now our members are ready to welcome the world, and share our faith with anyone and everyone”, said Richards. “We need to show that the Christian faith is relevant to all cultures”.The ‘Ultimate Gold’ events have been happening from noon until late every day and go on until August 12. For a program of events currently taking place go to http://www.stratfordchurches.co.uk/ultimategold/index.html#D12 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET By Tarsila BurityPosted Aug 7, 2012 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

  • South Carolina lawsuit parties agree to temporary injunction

    first_img Rebecca Alford says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments (51) [Episcopal News Service] A South Carolina Circuit Court judge Jan. 31 signed a consent order issuing a temporary injunction concerning use of registered diocesan names and marks that are claimed by Bishop Mark Lawrence and other leaders who led some Episcopalians in that state out of the Episcopal Church.The temporary injunction extends a previous temporary restraining order and will remain in effect until Judge Diane S. Goodstein decides differently or rules on an underlying lawsuit begun by Lawrence against the Episcopal Church. All parties to that suit consented to the temporary injunction. However, any party may request a hearing on having the injunction modified or dissolved. Such a request requires 14 days’ notice.A temporary injunction is meant to maintain the status quo and prevent damage or change before the legal questions raised in a lawsuit are answered. After the trial on those issues, the court may issue a permanent injunction or cancel the temporary injunction.Goodstein’s order came a day before a hearing she had scheduled for Feb. 1 to determine if the temporary order should be extended or whether she should impose a temporary injunction.When she imposed the temporary restraining order on Jan. 23, the judge said only Lawrence and 24 other people associated with him could use the diocesan seal as described in its registration with South Carolina Secretary of State, as well as the names “The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of South Carolina,” “The Diocese of South Carolina” and “The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina.” Those three titles were registered on Nov. 5, 2010, according to the order.Any other “individual, organization, association or entity” is prevented by both the order and now the injunction from using those marks and seals, Goodstein said.She issued the temporary restraining order three days before a group of people who want to remain in the Episcopal Church held an organizational meeting at Grace Episcopal Church in Charleston.Goodstein’s order required the group to change its name and remove the Diocese of South Carolina’s shield from its materials. And its first item of business on Jan. 26 was to make that name change official in order to act with what attorney Thomas Tisdale called “an abundance of caution, and with the desire to comply” with the order.The group formally agreed to use the name “the Episcopal Church in South Carolina” in place of what Tisdale, elected chancellor later in the meeting, said “we believe is our true and lawful name.”A Jan. 31 notice on the group’s website said that the temporary injunction “is not an unusual development, and it signifies only that these issues remain to be decided at a future time.”On the other hand, the group that maintains it still is the Diocese of South Carolina said after the temporary injunction was issued that the Episcopal Church had decided “not put up a fight.”The temporary injunction is related to the suit that was filed in state circuit court Jan. 4. The action, the original plaintiffs said in a press release at the time, was taken “to protect the diocese’s real and personal property and that of its parishes.”The suit also asked the court to prevent the Episcopal Church from “infringing on the protected marks of the diocese, including its seal and its historical names, and to prevent the church from assuming the diocese’s identity, which was established long before the Episcopal Church’s creation,” according to the press release.Goodstein’s Jan. 23 order made clear that it applied only to the names and seal, and not the other matters alleged in the suit. More information about the lawsuit is here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 February 1, 2013 at 9:59 pm You said:”My goal is to see my Diocese continue under My bishop in the buildings that generations of my family have founded built and maintained for the purpose they founded built and maintained worshiping as we have been given the ministry. If we can do that, MOST of us lawrencites would be glad to give you the name and seal you want and need for the reasons set forth in your argument. That can tip the tide.” Am I to understand that the goal is to “trade” the name and seal for the property? That hardly seems right. There are many Episcopalians who have attended in their parish from the cradle. Many have generously given of their time, talent and estates to benefit the parish their families attend. Many have donated heavily to maintain these buildings over generations. Are they to just give up these things without any consideration to their own family history because they wish to continue with TEC? The continuing Episcopalians haven’t done anything to deserve that loss. They have continued to follow the leadership of the national church and without any consideration for their historical ties or even the decency of a vote, their churches were taken over by something and someone they disagree with. They are told they are no longer Episcopalian. Without their permission or consent they are now informed they have been disconnected from TEC and they are now another religion. And “Oh, by the way, we are keeping the stuff and you have to go somewhere else if you want to be Episcopalian”. In most cases, it wasn’t that nice. Most have been unceremoniously cast out from their home churches without so much as a “Don’t let the door hit you” and called horrible, ugly names. They have listened to others call the Presiding Bishop a witch, the devil, and disrespected in the most vile and hateful ways. Why? What have these Episcopalians done to deserve such treatment? When did Mark Lawrence become the idol to be worshipped and followed instead of God? Why is property more important than unity? When did the “third leg of the stool” of scripture, tradition and reason get broken off and how will it stand without reason. Being free to have opinions and the ability to think and discuss are hallmarks of being an Episcopalian. Why are parishioners expected now to just sit down and shut up and do as you are told or get out? I was confirmed as a child in my parish. I served my church and pledged and tithed every single week. I have not removed my name from the rolls. I am still a member. But I was asked if I wanted to leave the national church. I was not given a vote. I was not asked how I felt about any of this. I was removed from the email list and parishioners have been told not to talk to me because I wish to remain Episcopalian. I am not over dramatizing. That is really how it has been. Am I supposed to just accept that my church no longer exists? It seems backwards to me that those who want to CONTINUE as Episcopalians in an Episcopalian Parish they have always attended are expected to forfeit their parish to those who want to leave and change everything. “The Episcopal Church Welcomes You” doesn’t have an addendum that says (except for those people) Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET February 1, 2013 at 5:39 pm It is called spin. A majority is “some.” Of course while majority is more accurate, some looks much more favorable to the readers from whom funds will be solicited to fund the battle in SC. February 1, 2013 at 5:45 pm Some of the most violent fights in history have been within the Christian Church. It sounds prudent to find ways to reduce tensions before proceeding to make future decisions, The Church is about grace and not all law and order. Where is God’s grace in the Diocese of South Carolina? The continuing Episcopal Church has an opportunity in its decisions and response to the present situation to be the Church and Love of Jesus Christ. You remail in my prayers.Vance MannAsheville, NC February 4, 2013 at 5:33 pm Mr Kivel, What makes you think they, the traditionalists whom you call “Lawrencites”, would want to return to The Episcopal Church. Some think better no church at all than “TEC”. Rebecca Alford says: February 4, 2013 at 1:56 pm The moral is that when you suspect a candidate for the episcopate is a snake, trust your guts and refuse to approve him… Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY February 1, 2013 at 11:00 pm Change? One needs to look WHO has changed. The Scriptures and BCP sure haven’t. Neither does our faith. Marc Kivel says: Marc Kivel says: Hank Otto says: Hank Otto says: February 1, 2013 at 6:06 pm That sounds good but it is a two way street. Ignoring all of the churches and orthodox congregants that TEC has sued over the past years; and ignoring the fact that when they took their property put it up for sale to any purchaser except the people who they just took the property from, ignoring all of that you are correct. TEC can step forward in a very Christian manor and leave orthodox congregations alone. That may not be the legal approach but you did not reference legality but Christian charity.Where is the Grace in SC. The answer is in the very fact that TEC met in Grace Church. TEC has repeatedly pushed orthodox majority parishes out of their properties across the country. Bishop Lawrence told each church they could align themselves as they please. Grace and a few others stayed with TEC without any interference from the Diocese of SC. That is the Grace of it.You are right though. Now is the time if ever to reduce tensions and hammer out a solution. There is a shred of a possibility that the consent order was entered so the parties could do so behind the scenes. I would not wager on it but it is possible. February 2, 2013 at 12:42 am It reminds me of the monkey caught by a jar. The monkey saw some tid-bits in the bottom of a large jar and reached in to get them. it clasped it greedy hand onto the tid-bits. When the monkey tried to take its hand out of the jar while holding onto to the morsels, it could not remove its hand through the neck of the jar. A man came out of the swamp area and captured the monkey. Why? The monkey was too greedy and had to hang onto what it thought it had.The moral of the story is: TEc might want to let go of it’s “all in” legal strategy on this jar that we call The Diocese OF South Carolina. If it releases, it may survive. If it continues to hold on to what it has always done to get morsels, and loses it’s sovereignty, it may lose it’s freedom to be a national “church” altogether. February 4, 2013 at 2:33 pm Ah, so you’re holding the name and seal subject to release of any claims on property: how very extortionate…a real Jack Iker kinda move…of course he’s not in the Episcopal Church either anymore so no surprise. Personally I think all Christians should give the lawrencians a big round of applause for convincing more folks that religion is all about being self-righteous, money and property centered, and lacking in the capacity to handle disagreement and leaving covenanted community when you don’t get your way….nice work, folks! An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Marc Kivel says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Joseph F Foster says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis February 1, 2013 at 5:59 pm I am unsure of your basis for saying Charles von Rosenberg was “lawfully appointed”.If the canons of the Diocese of South Carolina are observed, this meeting did not have a quorum and the new appointments – yea, the very existence of “The Episcopal Church in South Carolina” – are non-canonical, null, and void.The only way the establishment of “The Episcopal Church in South Carolina” ex nihilo is at all canonical is if the Diocese of South Carolina has, in fact, left TEC, and the area is left with no presence of the Episcopal Church. Dr. Schori and the TEC refuse to acknowledge that this is possible. John D. Andrews says: Submit a Job Listing February 4, 2013 at 2:18 pm YOu write “If PECDSC, or one of the three earlier disputed dioceses finally prevails and is recognized by the courts as the legitimate Episcopal diocese of South Carolina, TEC as we know it will collapse.” I note that only the insane asylum known as South Carolina has laws which seemingly consistently treat national churches as subsidiary to the local congregations – not surprising as some South Carolinians never learned that being part of a community means sometimes having to not have it your way. But what can you expect from folks who still take enormous pride in starting the Civil War and the resultant death and destruction? To say that I have contempt for mr. lawrence and his followers would be much too mild a sentiment… February 1, 2013 at 9:53 pm He’s where He promised He’d be. His Word. And His Sacraments. Until those of us who consider outselves “Anglican” ditch the new inventions and revisionism and restore the Faith as this church has received it, we’re going to keep asking this question. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Joseph F Foster says: February 1, 2013 at 5:23 pm I think that TEC is very wise to let these people simmer away with their pettifogging injunctions when it is obvious to even the most disinterested observer that the new Bishop is the lawfully appointed Bishop of the diocese whose name we dare not speak. It is a farcical situation and tells a clear story to those whose eyes are wide open . TEC should continue to remain at a safe distance until the time is right to step in.MikeLondon England. Marc Kivel says: February 2, 2013 at 8:13 am My dear brothers in Christ, Hank Yarbrough and Hank Otto, are still talking about Law, not Paul’s New Testament idea of GRACE. Grace is not about winning nor is it about seeking to be right nor is it about creating wonderful arguments. Grace is more concerned about staying in relationship than being right. Can we trust that together in our relationship with Christ and one another, there will be a new day, a glorious future? Let’s hang together.Vance Mann Marc Kivel says: February 1, 2013 at 7:33 pm I have enjoyed your posts. They are well thought out and generally well argued. (A tad of unnecessary sarcasm from time to time but I can hardly hold that against you. I actually liked “lawrencite”. Rather may catch on like Franciscan Dominican or Augustinian but I digress). We are on other sides of the argument to be sure. We do not agree on much.If I understand your posting I think we are in complete agreement. I do not want to see TEC destroyed. Not out of altruism. It is not my goal to see TEC go down. My goal is to see my Diocese continue under My bishop in the buildings that generations of my family have founded built and maintained for the purpose they founded built and maintained worshiping as we have been given the ministry. If we can do that, MOST of us lawrencites would be glad to give you the name and seal you want and need for the reasons set forth in your argument. That can tip the tide. We are not the sheep being led as many TEC people suggest. In SC in think even von Rosenberg will soon agree that the flock will eventually start hearing the Shepherd.A compromise can be worked out and it can be worked out in a win win manner that will set a course for inexpensive resolutions nationwide that will strengthen TECs mission and give it the institutional security tat you correctly note that it needs at he same time affording us he same and if the purple people have their wits to even figure out a way to stay in communion with one anotherBig challenge but it can be done This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 February 2, 2013 at 11:23 am A sad situation indeed. However, after the state process is done this will go to the federal level, and at the federal circuit level it will rule by precedent in the fourth circuit, which has already ruled in favor of TEC in such cases. Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Marc Kivel says: Marc Kivel says: February 4, 2013 at 2:24 pm Out of curiosity, always been an Episcopalian…I mean before you left to join the church of Lawrence? Rector Shreveport, LA walter combs says: Lisa Fox says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY February 4, 2013 at 1:47 pm It would be better if the Episcopal Church simply excommunicated the Lawrencians and broke off relations with any Anglican church which recognized them given Mr. Lawrence’s lying to obtain the episcopate… February 1, 2013 at 4:40 pm I am a little bit puzzled by the tone, in this and other ENS stories, of the phrasing of statements regarding those who decided to leave the Episcopal Church. This story refers to Bishop Lawrence and other leaders who “led some Episcopalians” out of the church, seeming to imply that those who left were a random group of Lawrence followers, when, in fact, the diocesan decision to leave was ratified at a regularly-called convention on Nov. 17 by delegates chosen by the vestries of a majority of parishes, and by a majority of the clergy. It was a very orderly–and completely open–meeting, which I attended working as a journalist. Regardless of what one thinks of their decision, it was an action made at a Diocesan Convention, not a departure by “some people” following Lawrence. David W. Stowell says: February 2, 2013 at 6:11 am Rebecca, thank you for this poignant note. No one could have said it better. The comfort that you and many others like you can take is that you are not alone. There are many others like like you, including my daughter in Florence SC, and a larger body in SC and the nation. What happened in Florence is that the Episcopalians had to leave their own church, where some had been members for many, many years. This was through no fault of their own. They were innocent victims, sad but resolute. They have since made a strong church of their own committed to God and to the Episcopal Church. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ronald J. Caldwell says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel February 1, 2013 at 5:50 pm I agree that the case law points toward a win for Bishop Lawrence’s Diocese. I think people are making too much out of the consent order. The only thing that can be deduced from that is that TEC has decided not to fight that battle at that time. They have not thrown in the towel. BUT as you say the case law that will control the end result is quite unfavorable to TECs position. Thank goodness for the SC Supreme Court! Rector Knoxville, TN February 4, 2013 at 7:20 pm But those are th ones who think what they may regard as a wicked heretical church is better than no church at all. But those who would rather belong to / go to no church whatever than The Episcopal Church aren’t apt to be found among your pewsters. And while they may or may not think much of the >i>via media, they are apt to think a lot less of the current VIA MEDIA , and respond “Via Nulla”! David Yarbrough says: February 4, 2013 at 2:20 pm Well said… Marc Kivel says: Ronald J. Caldwell says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI February 5, 2013 at 7:42 am Ah then why do they insist on keeping the name, title and properties of those who they have excommunicated? Perhaps Lawrence the Pseudo-bishop would care to explain? Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs February 1, 2013 at 7:36 pm Mr. Malone is correct. This article appears very biased, as the active communicants in the Diocese did not take this decision lightly. More than half of the Diocese’s churches and their communicants have made a stand with their Bishop. We have spent more than three years making every effort to avoid the current situation. Speaking for myself, I made my decision only after an exhaustive study of scripture and hours in prayer. While I believe that everyone is entitled to the same rights under civil law, there are strict limitations to what is allowed under ecclesiastical law. I am not willing to defy the scriptures or to sit silently as those in authority do so and flaunt their actions. While Katharine Jefferts Schori is no longer my Presiding Bishop, I will continue to pray for her and TEC in its open defiance of scripture.The slant presented in this article makes it apparent that the Presiding Bishop and her staff of writers appear bent on maintaining their current position regardless of the consequences to themselves and the communicants of TEC. This stand in the South Carolina courts will be exceedingly costly to the TEC and its communicants. The Honorable Diane Goodstein signed the Orders discussed in this skewed report, and her Orders conform to the most recent South Carolina Supreme Court case. The Supreme Court is not inclined to reverse itself simply because someone, regardless of whom that individual is, decides to reverse a theological position that has been church doctrine since the death of our Lord. Choosing to fight for a position that is contrary to scripture in South Carolina is like gargling with sulfuric acid. Rector Pittsburgh, PA February 1, 2013 at 9:09 pm Where’s Jesus in all of this? Mike Lawlor says: February 1, 2013 at 8:27 pm It continues to amuse me — to the point of outrageous guffaws — that Lawrence and his sect are claiming the name of “Episcopal” after long excoriating the Episcopal Church as a bunch of apostates. I’d think they’d want to call themselves Rwandans or Pittsburghians or Nashotians or some such name that more clearly describes them as the anti-Episcopalians in the U.S. LOL! Hank Otto says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Zcachary Brooks says: February 2, 2013 at 4:03 am It’s interesting to note that South Carolina was the first state to secede from the Union in 1860 after the election of Abraham Lincoln. Perhaps there is something of a secessionist element in the blood there? Marc Kivel says: David Yarbrough says: Marc Kivel says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ February 4, 2013 at 7:43 pm A problem with this in ordinary neutral property and trust law is that you can’t establish or assert a trust in something you don’t own. E.S. Roehm says: center_img Rector Albany, NY Hank Otto says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 South Carolina lawsuit parties agree to temporary injunction Consent action involves use of diocesan marks, names February 1, 2013 at 5:45 pm Must be very good eyes to see all the way from London! From my eyes in Charleston, and the eyes of a judge who has no dog in this fight, it pretty much looks like the corporate documents say otherwise. By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 1, 2013 Marc Kivel says: February 5, 2013 at 7:24 am Inasmuch as Mr. Lawrence is only a bishop by virtue of the action of The Episcopal Church of the United States of America in conformance with the constitution and canons, as opposed to the Lawrencian donatists who make things up to their benefit as they go along and complain of being persecuted for their puritanism, decides who and what constitutes a legitimate Diocese and Bishop irrespective of the unchristian behavior of the Lawrencians running to the secular courts and attempting to pull a Jack Iker Youth Minister Lorton, VA February 1, 2013 at 10:03 pm Then go to an Anglican Church. Why do you want to steal the Episcopal Church and change it? Rector Bath, NC February 2, 2013 at 10:26 am Schism in a Christian Church? Who is surprised? It has happened over and over again throughout history and will continue to happen. Change is inevitable, the old and tired erode and wither away, new and strong takes its place. As human beings learn through experience and scientific advances, we must adapt and move forward. If a mistake is made, we must trust that it will be revealed and corrected in God’s own time. Do not live in fear, love your fellow human beings. Peter Antoci says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest February 4, 2013 at 2:00 pm And may I ask who is the Honorable Diane Goodstein and what are her qualifications to render a decision in an ecclesiastical matter. Oh that’s right – we’re speaking of South Carolinians who desert a union or a church whenever THEIR point of view does not reign supreme…how very, very antebellum…or Southern Baptist…. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem February 4, 2013 at 1:55 pm When in the course of time the lawrencians fall out amongst themselves for some not being sufficiently “pure” to be lawrencian schismatics and donatists, I sincerely hope the true Episcopalians in the heartland of the murky minded South will have the good sense to ban those folks from returning to a church they have walked away from in a shameful and disgraceful manner…… Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC February 1, 2013 at 2:03 pm This is going to be going on for years, no doubt. But based on the precedent of the Pawley’s Island case, things look very optimistic in S Carolina for those who have chosen to leave TEC. February 4, 2013 at 6:28 pm Well Brother Joseph, what I have heard and observed is that the Lawrencians would not be the first group to leave the TEC in high dudgeon only to find that the via media tends not to survive fundamentalist congregationalism…in more than a few cases folks who left TEC can be found in pews, in classes, and at meals with us “sinners”…kind of where Our Lord would most likely be found, true? Joseph F Foster says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments are closed. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab February 2, 2013 at 4:24 pm It’s not “their” property. It was held in trust for TEC, and maintained by the members as a gift. The schismatics and their leader knew it all along, and if they had a drop of integrity they would admit it and simply leave the property of TEC behind. TEC owes the schismatic prayers and good wishes, but it does not owe them free churches.Just ONCE I would love to see this sort leave with integrity. Instead everyone single one has to try to run off with the silver. Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Hank Otto says: Marc Kivel says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI E. T. Malone, Jr. says: February 4, 2013 at 2:22 pm Oh…I forgot…you must be using the 1662 BCP and the KJV, correct? Nothing changes? LOL Boy has Lawrence sold you a story Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Milton Finch says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls February 3, 2013 at 2:54 pm I do bilieve the ” PB ” will have learn to swim with a mill stone around her neck. It would seem to follow from a certain caution from Holy Scripture. Alas but true. Thank God time will pass and so will this tragic leadership . It is however the failed House of Bishops who must answer for this time of trial.+DWS Milton Finch says: February 5, 2013 at 7:40 am Ah so since they don’t own the Episcopal Church or DFMS the Lawrencian Schismatics by their own admission under neutral property and trust law cannot establish or assert a trust in regards to the name, title or properties of the Episcopal Church or DFMS, or does the law only apply when South Carolinians decide that their donatism justifies their decamping with what is not theirs? Isn’t it wonderful how these very bibliolatrous folks seem to have forgotten the apostle’s teaching about keeping out of secular courts… Marc Kivel says: February 1, 2013 at 7:47 pm I have been following the whole farce very closely from London. If you stood outside looking in you would see the reality of someone claiming to be the leader of a diocese in a church which he has left. Either party may call themselves what they like, but there is a new Bishop who has been elected under the auspices of The Episcopal Church, as the former Bishop left the Church whose name it is nonsensical for him to use. As for the injunction – going down the legal route in any argument results in both parties losing out. Conciliation is the only way forward and for Christians to resort to law over who calls whom what ……words fail me so I will remain silent. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group February 5, 2013 at 7:33 am Mr. Yarborough, you are a poster boy for precisely why Christianity is a swear word in the mouths of a great many folks who live Christian lives outside your church building. One can accept the authority of the Holy Scriptures while acknowledging there are multiple ways of understanding the text and its message…ask your pseudo-bishop about it. As for the unique salvific nature of Jesus Christ? Has it occurred to you that perhaps the Kingdom of God is here now and that recognizing God Saves, which is what Jesus name means, while a given for Christians is less important than walking the Way irrespective of your relationship with God or “religious” affiliation? As for being vitriolic? LOL That you can make that statement with a straight face suggests you haven’t listened to yourself lately…thoughts? February 1, 2013 at 6:05 pm My brother, God’s grace in the Diocese of South Carolina exists in the form of speaking the truth in love – which Bishop Lawrence, the clergy, and the laity of the Diocese practice.TEC is in denial about truth in a variety of areas – with a heretical Presiding Bishop who openly denies the authority of Holy Scripture and the unique salvific nature of Jesus Christ.TEC does not proclaim even its own version of truth in a loving manner, but with vitriolic demeaning of those who in good faith hold other opinions – as exemplified by Dr. Schori’s speech in Charleston equating her opponents to mass murderers.I fear that those who join The Episcopal Church in South Carolina will be at least tarred with the same brush as Dr. Schori, even if they don’t hold to the same heresies. Marc Kivel says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC February 1, 2013 at 7:08 pm As a devoted supporter of the ongoing diocese, I must say I am bewildered at and disappointed in Tisdale’s decision here. Of course I am only an outsider and non-lawyer, but from my present perspective, I just cannot see the wisdom in not challenging this issue at this time. Perhaps someone with ties to the leadership could enlighten us on why TEC did not fight the restraining order. Unfortunately, I see this as a public relations disaster for the ongoing diocese. PECDSC has gone to court three times within one month. On Jan. 4 they filed a law suit asserting itself as the legitimate Episcopal diocese with the right to the property. It is curious to me that they chose a particular court in another county. 32 parishes have now signed on to this suit, more than half the parishes of the old diocese. On Jan. 23, they collected a Temporary Restraining Order from Judge Goodstein who issued it ex parte, that is, without the defendants being invited to appear. This was just three days before the ongoing diocesan convention. It was a clever, if mean-spirited, ambush. On Jan. 31, they got the restraining order extended indefinitely. All of these are “victories” in one way or another for PECDSC. Meanwhile TEC has taken no legal action at all, not even to challenge the restraining order. This gives the appearance of PECDSC as strong, resolute, and legally credible. On the other hand, TEC appears weak, hesitant, and uncertain. There are eleven local churches in the old diocese now in discernment, that is, on the fence and trying to decide which bishop to follow. These legal moves may well strengthen the hand of the Lawrence side and weaken the TEC side in these parishes and missions. Those people who think the PECDSC has a good chance of winning in the South Carolina courts may well be right, I reluctantly say. The All Saints Waccamaw case certainly strengthened the position of a local church against a denomination in South Carolina. Local courts tend to stay out of religious disputes. However, if this case goes to federal court, things could be very different. On the whole, federal courts around the country have tended to side with TEC and its dioceses as hierarchical institutions entitled to manage their own structures. TEC ‘s best hope may be to get this case into federal court. The All Saints Waccamaw case was not appealed to the US Supreme Court. The broader issue at hand is fundamental to the continuation of the Episcopal Church under its present Constitution and Canons. If PECDSC, or one of the three earlier disputed dioceses finally prevails and is recognized by the courts as the legitimate Episcopal diocese of South Carolina, TEC as we know it will collapse. There are eleven other dioceses in TEC that are solidly and consistently conservative (orthodox as they say). Central Florida is the other one in the southeast. These dioceses may well follow SC’s pattern of independence from TEC. An out-of-court settlement is always possible. But in any settlement TEC must prevail on the issue of legitimacy in order to maintain itself. PECDSC must relinquish the titles, seals and any other official functions of the Diocese of South Carolina. It seems to me this is not negotiable. The property issue is not so important. It could be worked out by compromise. TEC will survive without the Dennis Canon. It cannot survive if it loses its sovereignty. So South Carolina many well be a turning point one way or another for TEC. If it wins, it will validate the TEC constitution and strengthen its sovereignty. If it loses, it will disintegrate. The issue of sovereignty was the same one in the Civil War. If the Confederacy had prevailed, the principle of states’ rights would have been firmly established in the South. Then, in time, this principle would have worked to disintegrate the Confederacy itself and possibly the individual states. The South would now be like the Balkans or Central America, many independent small states and city-states no doubt locked in poverty. Thank God the Union prevailed. That meant sovereignty remained in the national government. We are all better off for it whether you want to believe it or not. James Lewis Pettigru was the most famous Lawyer in Charleston on the eve of the Civil War and head of the bar. He was also a Unionist. When he heard that the SC convention had voted to secede, he said “South Carolina is too small to be a republic and too large to be an insane asylum.” He knew the catastrophe to come and he was right. February 1, 2013 at 6:29 pm Many presbyteries in PCUSA have established plans that would allow congregations to leave the Presbyterian Church (USA) with their buildings if they first engage in an open discernment process and negotiate a settlement with the presbytery. Wouldn’t it be better if TEC were to put forth a similar plan instead of the tremendous expense of prolonged lawsuites and the probable loss in court? Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Vance Mann says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska David Yarbrough says: Joseph F Foster says: February 4, 2013 at 7:41 pm It would seem that they have already excommunicated The Episcopal Church. February 1, 2013 at 5:48 pm More appropriately those who have been left behind as TEC becomes increasingly liberal. February 2, 2013 at 4:37 pm You realize that no matter what the canons of the Diocese of South Carolina might say, the canons of the Episcopal Church still apply, right? They applied before Lawrence quit, and they applied during his departure, and they apply now, and they are why Lawrence CANNOT be the rightful bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina. Zachary Brooks says: walter combs says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Hugh Magee says: Marc Kivel says: Chris Walchesky says: Mike Lawlor says: South Carolina Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Chris Walchesky says: February 4, 2013 at 2:26 pm Sometimes you win by losing…ever hear of a fella named Jesus? Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Vance Mann says: February 1, 2013 at 11:26 pm If TEc is so consistent in going to the courts, as it has proven that it will in every single case to date, it MUST be recognized that someone will eventually strike back. That striker looks to be the Diocese OF South Carolina that has always been the Diocese OF South Carolina since before TEc existed. It even helped to establish TEc’s existence. The facts on the ground, as we all must observe, is that that Diocese OF South Carolina has left the now defunct denomination of TEc. It is now in court, as TEc has gone to court many times before this one event, irrelevantly I might add to TEc’s detriment, to protect what the Diocese OF South Carolina has always been. The many words of previous posters such as Ronald Caldwell do not and never will negate that reality. The courts will decide. Give it time. It does not look good at all for TEc in this mess. They would do much better to drop the attack which started when they tried to remove a sitting godly bishop from a diocese that had not left the group in the first place. Accept those parishes that wanted to be TEc and cut any and all losses. That way, you may not lose more. In other words, what happens if a few orthodox in those parishes that are outnumbered by the liberals decide to go against the numerical liberal numbers and sue the liberals out of their structures because of steadfast South Carolina law? Peace is better. Russ Post says: last_img read more

  • Initial structural changes recommended for Anglican Church of Canada

    first_img Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN [Anglican Journal — Mississauga, Ontario] The Anglican Church of Canada’s Council of General Synod on March 16 recommended that the coming General Synod adopt a constitutional amendment that would alter the nature of all but two of its standing committees as part of initial changes to the national church’s structures.Under the proposed amendment to Section 39 of the General Synod Handbook, the pension committee and financial management committee would remain as standing committees of General Synod, and five would function as coordinating committees.Co-coordinating committees would be limited to five members, a reduction from the current range of between seven to 12 in standing committees. The proposed coordinating committees are: faith, worship and ministry; partners in mission and eco-justice; resources for mission; communications and information resources; and Anglican Journal.After lengthy discussions, workshops and straw polls held over a three-day period, the council approved other motions that recommended a number of the restructuring proposals made in January by a national consultation. Forty participants were convened at that meeting by Archbishop Fred Hiltz to review the church’s structures as mandated by Vision 2019, the church’s strategic plan.The council did not, however, recommend the proposal to reduce the frequency of its in-person meetings, from six to four times in the triennium, and to hold more regular and frequent communication using electronic means.Instead, members left it up to the next council — which will include new members elected at the General Synod meeting this July — to “review the length and number of physically gathered meetings to minimize costs while ensuring it effectively fulfills its governance mandate.”It also “encouraged” the officers of General Synod and the next council to “consider carefully what business of [council], in part or in entirety, might be done at any point in the year using communication information technologies and electronic methods of meeting.”Some council members had questions, suggestions and at times, varying expressions of concerns and “anxieties” about decisions made on other proposals.“We’re not cutting where we need to cut. We need to be more brave about more things,” said the Rev. Lynne McNaughton, from the ecclesiastical province of British Columbia and Yukon.British Columbia Bishop James Cowan shared the sentiment, saying that some of the changes don’t go far enough.Lela Zimmer, also from the ecclesiastical province of British Columbia and Yukon, questioned the “arbitrary setting” of committee membership at five. She said the faith, worship and ministry committee, of which she is a member, has been “benefitted by more voices brought to the table” and “cross-fertilization” of ideas.Janet Marshall, who facilitated the consultation, explained to council that five was deemed a good number for committee membership owing to the church’s geographical spread, the number of its provinces, and for achieving a level of comfort and effectiveness at meetings held electronically.Canon Gene Packwood, clergy representative of the ecclesiastical province of Rupert’s Land, asked how much savings would be generated by the proposed changes to the composition of committees and frequency of in-person meetings.“A lot depends on the decrease in committee size and how much travel” will be reduced, said General Synod treasurer Hanna Goschy. “It could be a couple of hundred thousands.”Archdeacon Michael Thompson, the church’s general secretary, said that while these changes are “not the panacea that will address all financial challenges before us,” it would help “set us for leaner preparations” down the road.Meanwhile, the council, in another motion, also called on General Synod to flag as “a matter of priority,” the national consultation’s proposal to conduct operational reviews on the effectiveness of the Resources for Mission (RFM), the national church’s communications vehicles, and its informational technology capacity to support electronic meetings of councils and committees.The motion did not go into such specifics as time frame or how the reviews would be conducted.A review of the RFM will look into the effectiveness of the church’s “investment in fundraising, stewardship and planned giving,” according to documents prepared by members of the structures working group.In the area of communications, the review would look at the role and practices of the Anglican Journal, the General Synod communications website and the Anglican Video and assess their impact on dioceses and other ministries. It will also study new and emerging practices in media, the practices of other churches, and recommend ways of building communication capacities, said the documents.Thompson explained that the review was in keeping with Vision 2019’s goal of having “a national communication platform, integrated and accessible at the parish, diocesan, and national levels.” He acknowledged that it was “an enormous and daunting goal,” and the church was looking at external resources for the review.The council also requested the primate and the church’s metropolitans (senior bishops) to initiate” a review of the House of Bishops’ role and the focus and frequency of its meetings, which were recommended in the consultation report.Archbishop Colin Johnson, diocesan bishop of the diocese of Toronto and metropolitan of the ecclesiastical province of Ontario, said the work of restructuring was “a lot like trying to lose weight.” Even losing a few pounds by giving up on some sweets, cutting down on meat and potatoes, and exercising more means one “will last longer,” said Johnson, who is also a member of the structures working group. 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  • Dartmouth withdraws Tengatenga’s appointment as foundation dean

    first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bill Rankin says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Former Southern Malawi Bishop James Tengatenga will not become the dean of Dartmouth College’s Tucker Foundation, the college has announced. Photo: Anglican Communion News Service[Episcopal News Service] Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, has withdrawn the appointment of former Southern Malawi Bishop James Tengatenga as dean of its Tucker Foundation saying that his past comments about homosexuality “have compromised his ability to serve effectively.”Meanwhile, some North American church leaders are surprised and saddened by the decision, saying that they know Tengatenga as a bridge-builder and reconciler who has a deep understanding of the complex issues concerning human sexuality.Tengatenga, a long-standing member and current chair of the Anglican Consultative Council (ACC), the Anglican Communion’s main policy-making body, announced in mid-July that after 15 years as bishop of Southern Malawi he was tendering his resignation to become the Virginia Rice Kelsey Dean of the William Jewett Tucker Foundation at Dartmouth College from Jan. 1, 2014.After some members of the Dartmouth community and other groups expressed concerns about Tengatenga’s appointment, Philip J. Hanlon, college president, said in an Aug. 14 statement that he felt it was important for him to meet with the bishop and ask “tough questions about his earlier statements on homosexuality” and “his leadership within an Anglican Church in Africa that has often been hostile regarding gay rights.”It was not clear to which earlier statements Hanlon was referring, but in an Aug. 15 e-mail to Episcopal News Service, Tengatenga said those protesting his appointment “have used selectively what I said in 2004” when he was quoted as opposing the election and ordination of the Rt. Rev. Gene Robinson as the first openly gay bishop in the Anglican Communion. Tengatenga has said that his understanding of human sexuality has since evolved and that he now considers all people equal regardless of their sexual orientation.Tengatenga, who was elected as ACC chair in 2009, and also became chair of the Anglican Communion Standing Committee, told ENS on Aug. 15 that he is “saddened” by Dartmouth’s decision. “They have chosen to trust bigotry over truth and justice.”He said that the college has yet to inform him formally of their decision but that once they do he intends to seek legal counsel.One of the groups that countersigned the protest is the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. “Of all the groups to take the lead against a black person on flimsy grounds,” Tengatenga said. “So much for the advancement of colored people … It is sad that such an institution can stoop so low.”Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas has known Tengatenga for close to two decades in a variety of capacities across the Anglican Communion, most recently in his leadership of the Anglican Consultative Council.“James is fundamentally committed to the belief that differences are a gift from God and we are at our God-given best when we come together to serve God’s mission of restoration and reconciliation,” said Douglas, who serves on the Anglican Communion Standing Committee alongside Tengatenga. “I am deeply saddened that Dartmouth has turned its back on such a fine Christian leader who has demonstrated over and over again the inclusive love of God in Christ.”Bishop Michael Ingham, whose Diocese of New Westminster in Canada has been blessing same-sex relationships since 2002, wrote to Hanlon saying that he believes the decision to withdraw Tengatenga’s appointment “to be quite wrong … He is an African first, proud of his roots and culture, but also widely travelled, scholarly, wise, and sophisticated in his grasp of the complex realities of justice. He has a far greater understanding of how to bridge cultural differences towards the goal of reconciliation than most of us in North America.”Tengatenga recently visited the New Westminster diocese as the keynote speaker for its annual convention. He “came here to build bridges between Africa and Canada on the contentious matter of homosexuality,” wrote Ingham. “He received three standing ovations. Mr. President, I can assure you no one with homophobic opinions would have received such a welcome here. His wisdom, humor, intelligence, and grace far transcends the narrow confines of a single issue.”Dartmouth, Ingham said, “has lost an extraordinary opportunity to forge a relationship with Africa through one of its outstanding intellectual leaders.”New Hampshire Bishop Rob Hirschfeld said he had been eager to welcome Tengatenga as a brother bishop to his diocese.“As Christians, our posture is one of hospitality; that’s how we are called to be,” he wrote in an e-mail to ENS. “I also recognize that it was a bold appointment considering how politically charged American colleges tend to be. As an alumnus, I have some familiarity of the climate at Dartmouth. Bishop James’s effectiveness, despite his conciliatory work in the Anglican Communion and his powerful statements of openness and support of the LBGTQ community, would also have been complicated by the apparent indefinite role of the Tucker Foundation.“If the Dartmouth College decision took place within the councils of the church, I think we would have benefited from some holy conversation that would have led to a deepening of communion and reconciliation. I would welcome that. We see that such a conversation is probably not what the college administration bargained for in filling this vacancy, so the revoking of the appointment is sad, but understandable. I pray that some healthy reflection will proceed out of this whole event.”Hanlon said that in his meeting with Tengatenga, the bishop spoke about his “inspiring life of service to some of the world’s most vulnerable people, especially victims of HIV-AIDS [and] … his commitment to gay rights and how he has worked to support the LGBTQ community in Malawi in the ways that are most effective, given the country’s cultural context.”But after “much reflection and consultation” with senior leaders at Dartmouth, Hanlon said it had become clear that Tengatenga’s past comments about homosexuality “and the uncertainty and controversy they created have compromised his ability to serve effectively as dean of Tucker.”Tengatenga had issued a statement on July 18 saying that he supports marriage equality and equal rights for everyone.“Let me state unequivocally and categorically that I consider all people equal regardless of their sexual orientation,” said Tengatenga. “The dignity of all should be honored and respected. As is the case with many people, my ideas about homosexuality have evolved over time. I’m not ashamed to say that, but I also think I’m not alone…”Tengatenga said he felt it was important to offer some historical context and noted that the changing attitudes on human sexuality, especially in the United States, “have been staggering. The 2003 consecration of V. Gene Robinson as Episcopal bishop of New Hampshire represented an extraordinary gift because it forced people — from parishioners to bishops to people outside the church — to think carefully and critically about the issue of homosexuality and gay rights. As a result, many of us came to very different understandings of the faith and the gospel.”“So, let me be clear. I support marriage equality and equal rights for everyone, and I look forward to working with everyone at Dartmouth—everyone. I believe that discrimination of any kind is sinful. When I say that I am committed to the human rights of all, I mean all.”But Tengatenga’s statement was not enough to allay concerns and Hanlon concluded that “the foundation and Dartmouth’s commitment to inclusion are too important to be mired in discord over this appointment. Consequently, we have decided not to move forward with the appointment of Dr. Tengatenga as dean of the Tucker Foundation.”Dartmouth will now develop plans for interim leadership at Tucker and convene a task force charged with making recommendations as to the foundation’s mission and organizational structure. On its website, the foundation says, it “educates Dartmouth students for lives of purpose and ethical leadership, rooted in service, spirituality, and social justice.”Tengatenga has said that he is not withdrawing his resignation as bishop of Southern Malawi but that he has not decided what he will do next. “It is in the Lord’s hands,” he told ENS.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter of the Episcopal News Service. August 16, 2013 at 6:02 pm Very confusing and confused situation. What did Bishop Tengatenga actually say in 2011 regarding human rights in his own country? Why did the leadership of Dartmouth not engage with him on this topic openly during the selection process? If the Bishop now says to the world that he supports equality for all, what evidence is there that he may be speaking falsely? All in all, Dartmouth College looks very bad at this point, a school led by administrators who do not know how to administrate. They should have consulted Bishop Ingram and Bishop Hirschfeld before making and announcing such a drastic decision, if only as a matter of simple courtesy. If the administrators of Dartmouth aren’t sure of the mission of the Tucker Foundation at this point, they certainly should have worked through that issue with outside counsel before considering any candidates to begin with. (From a priest in the Diocese of NH) Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY August 15, 2013 at 4:22 pm Another example of correctness gone wild. Dartmouth should have known all of this Bishops stands as they went through the appointment process. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments (11) Gene Bourquin says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 August 16, 2013 at 8:41 am Bigotry on the left is as alive and well as it is on the right. Just how far back in time does one’s praxis, theoria and polesis have to be lily white at Dartmouth? Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing August 16, 2013 at 1:25 pm 2011 was two years ago. I believe in forgiveness. Of course, I am a Christian. We’re talking about his fitness for a job.You are correct, Justin, that perhaps I am too quick too judge. But I feel like the person who has judged less, and harmed less. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA August 16, 2013 at 4:08 pm As a graduate of Dartmouth College and an Episcopal Priest, I am ashamed and embarassed. The college and its new President have some very serious soul searching to do. Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rev. Mike Neal says: August 18, 2013 at 3:19 pm Are you serious Peg, come on……………………….Bishop “T” is a wonderful Christian, and he doesn’t bend the “Gospel”, he got the ax because he doesn’t conform to the West crooked theology, plain and simple. Comments are closed. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Thomas Connolly says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID August 16, 2013 at 6:37 am Why does the liberal church consistently think that anti-gay statements and attitude do not rise to the level of true concern? It is the mark of truly second class status when lip service leads to inaction or protests against action. In 2011 this Bishop declare his province “total against homosexuality.” If his statements were against races of peoples or other groups, would I be reading, “I find President Hanlon’s decision very painful . . . ” I don’t think so. As a gay Anglican I am just about feed up with the listening and discerning about my nature and my equality as a human being and a member of the body of Christ. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Dartmouth withdraws Tengatenga’s appointment as foundation dean Press Release Servicecenter_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Anglican Communion Rector Tampa, FL Tags August 15, 2013 at 5:43 pm We have worked in Malawi on HIV, TB, malaria and other health issues nonstop since 2001. In all that time I have known Bishop Tengatenga to be an open, thoughtful, intelligent, and caring man. As he says, his position on gay men and lesbians has changed. He went from a deeply African perspective to a decidedly counter-cultural and more just one. I greatly admire Dartmouth, but I believe they lost badly when they deprived themselves of this man of nearly unique integrity.Bill Rankin, President Emeritus, Global AIDS Interfaith Alliance (GAIA,) San Francisco Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis August 16, 2013 at 10:56 am With all due respect, would you think it fair if statements you made 10 years ago, when you had a different position, should be used against you right now? We do believe in repentance and transformation as Christians, right? Bishop James has said that he supports marriage equality and LGBT rights now, which is extraordinary considering that he is a bishop from Africa. Should we not be quick to commend and praise and slow to condemn and reject?BTW, I’m a gay Anglican as well. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Gene Bourquin says: August 16, 2013 at 3:37 pm Hanlon’s clumsy, heavy handed decision has resulted in a sad day for Dartmouth , Anglicanism and Christianity. Opportunity lost for guiding the esteemed Tucker Foundation from an Anglican perspective. Also , it would have been most interesting to learn about Bishop Tengatenga’s perspective regarding the Islamist slavery and Christianicide that is is paining Africa so greatly.He put himself at great personal risk for evolving to support gay marriage in the African context.Now Hanlon rewards him with limbo, bowing to the alter of classic narcissistic political correctness.I’ll give President Hanlon an earful when I’m next up at Dartmouth ! Joseph D Herring says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Justin Cheng says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA August 15, 2013 at 6:56 pm As a son of Dartmouth, and as a priest of the Episcopal Church, I find President Hanlon’s decisionvery painful. Bishop Douglas has it right. We needed some holy conversation about this. Dartmouth is trying its best to be a major player in the struggle for a more inclusive society. So also is Bishop Tengatenga. Both Dartmouth and the Church have work to do. Joe Herring,’55 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Edgar Kinnier says: By Matthew DaviesPosted Aug 15, 2013 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rev. Mark H. Hatch says: Robert Stiefel says: Lawrence johnson ’75 says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more