kxhtpr

  • Decomposed body of fisherman found hanging from tree at Parika

    first_imgThe partially-decomposed body of a 46-year-old fisherman was found hanging from a tree in front of an abandoned lot on Thursday afternoon.Selwin Pratt was discovered in front of Lot 183 Parika Trainline, East Bank Essequibo (EBE) near his brother’s property.Eyewitnesses reportedly discovered the body in a kneeling position, indicating that foul play could have been involved.The dead man’s brother stated that a strange smell was detected when walking on a nearby dam, but this did not cause any suspicion, since it could have been the carcasses of fish.However, when he was returning with some animals, his sibling’s body was discovered.The body being removed from the scene“We smelling a scent when walking on the dam…Until I go to look after the cow, then I see my brother,” said the brother.The man said he was told that his brother went to the East Coast of Demerara and as such, he did not worry about his whereabouts. The man says he sees no reason as to why Pratt would harm himself.“They said he gone on the East Coast and I thinking that he gone there to work the fishing boat,” he explained.Guyana Times understands that the fisherman was a father of one and had no definite place of residence since he would reside with relatives. The Police are awaiting the result of the post-mortem to determine their next move as they continue to question persons in the area.last_img read more

  • All systems a go for weekend races

    first_imgAnother high speed weekend of races at the Taylor Speedway is quickly approaching.The Doug Babcock memorial Points challenge will take place on Saturday and Sunday.- Advertisement -The races are making up for a previous cancellation because of heavy rain.The races will begin at 3 p.m.on Saturday and 1 p.m. on Sunday.For more information on the races at the Taylor Speedway, visit its official website.last_img

  • ‘THE BEST NEWS STORY FOR DECADES’ – CATHAOIRLEACH BROGAN

    first_imgBrothers Stuart and Joe Moore, part of the Letterkenny Today Town’s Group, at last night’s reception at Market Square.Chairman of Donegal County Council, Cllr Ciaran Brogan has described it as one of the best news stories for Donegal for decades.And who could argue with him?Victory for Letterkenny in the National Tidy Towns Contest yesterday is a real shot in the arm for the Cathedral Town. No longer can the town be called shabby or run-down.Here Cllr Brogan writes for Donegal Daily and looks forward to all the benefits which will come Letterkenny’s way with its new-found title.“Letterkenny is basking in an historic double with the announcement that the town has won the overall National Tidy Towns award and the equivalent for Largest Urban Area.“For us as a Local Authority this represents one of the best news stories in decades. Before its abolition, Letterkenny Town Council had invested hugely in the town from an environmental perspective including the development of the town parks and open spaces. “We were one of the first Councils in the country to employ a Town Gardener and a Litter Warden which were significant in terms of what we have achieved. We had, and have, a dedicated team which has advanced the overall look of Letterkenny and the wider area.“A huge tribute is, of course, owed to the Tidy Towns Committee under its chairperson, Anne McGowan, and its hard-working team of volunteers who have over the years never shirked in the Committee’s objectives. It was the dream of many that we would get this far and now that dream has been realised.“We cannot ever forget the massive contribution of the late Jim McCormick who kept the Tidy Towns Committee going when some might have surrendered the initiative. He was the guiding light and the inspiration behind the local tidy towns movement and always confidently dreamed that one day Letterkenny would bask in the national spotlight.“He was invariably looking for that extra point or two every year that got him, his committee and the town closer to the big award and continued to work hard when the points total fell short. What a proud man he would have been today and what pride his family must feel at this achievement.“As the First Citizen of this county, I share in the pride of these awards which represent a huge vote of confidence in the town and its people.You only reap what you sow and the plants that we have sown over the years have now reaped the ultimate award. I am confident that we will benefit enormously through tourism and business development for Letterkenny as a result. “These awards must also be attributed to the townspeople themselves. We have over ninety Residents Associations in the town, each and every one of them striving to improve the appearance of their respective areas and continuing to maintain that objective. The business community, too, has played a significant role through investment and let’s not forget either the local schools initiative which has generated an interest in the environment amongst our children.“Last night’s reception in the Market Square, when the Tidy Town Committee and Council representatives returned with the National title, was an occasion to remember for us all.“The emotion of a dream that has become a reality was there for all to see and that is truly what community is all about.”‘THE BEST NEWS STORY FOR DECADES’ – CATHAOIRLEACH BROGAN was last modified: September 29th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Anne McGowanCllr Ciaran Broganletterkennytidy townslast_img read more

  • BUS DRIVER SENTENCED TO LIFE IN PRISON FOR DONEGAL MURDER

    first_imgA bus driver has been sentenced to life in prison at the Special Criminal Court for the murder of a 27-year-old man in a dissident republican attack in Donegal.Martin Kelly, 37, from Strabane, drove Andrew Burns to a church in Donnyloop in February 2008 where he was shot dead.Kelly was also sentenced to eight years in prison for possession of a firearm. Mr Justice Paul Butler said the court had no discretion on the murder charge.The family of the 27-year-old painter and decorator left the court this afternoon after telling the three judges of the indescribable pain, grief and trauma they are still suffering four years after the murder of their brother and son.Mr Burns was involved with the dissident republican group Óglaigh na hÉireann, as was Martin Kelly.Kelly was told to bring Burns from his home in Strabane to Donnyloop in Donegal for a punishment shooting.He drove him to the church car park where three men were waiting in a hedge.A gunman fired at Burns, he ran but a second shot killed him. All three got into Kelly’s car and he drove them back across the border, stopping to hide the gun in a hedge.Kelly was interviewed by officers from the gardaí and the PSNI at a hotel in the North where he admitted what he had done.He also named the others involved and his life is now in danger.He was sentenced today to life in prison.BUS DRIVER SENTENCED TO LIFE IN PRISON FOR DONEGAL MURDER was last modified: January 24th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DonnyloopMARTIN KELLYstrabanelast_img read more

  • Senior Lunches

    first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals Tuesday: Beef and mushrooms with pearl onions, vegetable blend California, peas. Wednesday: Boneless chicken fricassee, green beans, yellow wax beans. Thursday: Stuffed cabbage rolls, broccoli, vegetable blend California. Friday: Vegetable lasagna with fire-roasted vegetables, peas, green beans. Lunch is served at noon weekdays at the Simi Valley Senior Citizens Center, 3900 Avenida Simi. Suggested donation is $5, or $2.25 for those 60 and older. Reservations must be made 48 hours in advance by calling (805) 583-6365. Lunch is served to Moorpark seniors at noon weekdays in the Moorpark Active Adult Center, 799 Moorpark Ave. Suggested donation is $2.25. For information, call (805) 517-6261. All meals are served with bread, dessert and fat-free milk. Here is this week’s menu: Monday: Chicken a la king, broccoli, yellow wax beans. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

  • Walk This Way: Body Designs Head to Toe

    first_img(Visited 165 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 When you examine what makes us tick, you find intelligent design from the top down and from the bottom up.Complementary mechanisms for upright balance during walking (PLoS One). We usually walk without much conscious attention; some of us can chew gum at the same time. Given that the human body is much taller than it is wide, and uses only two legs instead of four, it has a challenge: keeping balance during motion. We actually fall forward with each step, and have to compensate at the right time. Babies learning to walk, and stroke victims in PT (physical therapy), know how hard that can be. Six physiologists tried to figure out the physics and signals involved.Lateral balance is a critical factor in keeping the human body upright during walking. Two important mechanisms for balance control are the stepping strategy, in which the foot placement is changed in the direction of a sensed fall to modulate how the gravitational force acts on the body, and the lateral ankle strategy, in which the body mass is actively accelerated by an ankle torque. Currently, there is minimal evidence about how these two strategies complement one another to achieve upright balance during locomotion. We use Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) to induce the sensation of a fall at heel-off during gait initiation. We found that young healthy adults respond to the illusory fall using both the lateral ankle strategy and the stepping strategy. The stance foot center of pressure (CoP) is shifted in the direction of the perceived fall by ≈2.5 mm, starting ≈247 ms after stimulus onset. The foot placement of the following step is shifted by ≈15 mm in the same direction. The temporal delay between these two mechanisms suggests that they independently contribute to upright balance during locomotion, potentially in a serially coordinated manner.Now figure this out for basketball players, hurdlers, and gymnasts.Atomic resolution of muscle contraction (Osaka University). When you walk or flex a muscle, there are actual pushes and pulls going on at the subcellular level. The molecular motor myosin, which traverses actin membrances, is an “engineering marvel”, these scientists find. This machine is working out hard as you work out:At the molecular level, muscle contraction is defined by myosin molecules pulling actin filaments. New electron cryomicroscopy images with unprecedented resolution taken by researchers at Osaka University reveal unexpectedly large conformational changes in the myosin molecule during the pull. These findings, which can be seen in Nature Communications, provide new insights into how myosin generates force and a paradigm for the construction of nanomachines.To biophysicists like Keiichi Namba, professor at Osaka University, the ability of tiny molecules to generate large amounts of force seen in muscle make myosin an engineering marvel.5 Reasons Why Placentas Are Amazing (Live Science). This series by Mindy Waisberger tells readers amazing things about the life-support organ that nourished and protected us – and all placental mammals from mice to giraffes — in the womb. “It is the only organ that reproductive-age humans grow entirely from scratch,” she says. The organ is constantly adjusting to the baby within it, responding to hormones and secreting others. “Surrounding the placenta is a thin, protective layer known as the amniotic membrane, an intricate scaffold of proteins that carries nutrients and stem cells for fetal development.” Its ability to protect tissues is inspiring technologies for wound healing, she reports. Don’t be tempted to eat placenta, though: there’s no evidence it is healthy, as some claim.Characterization of the human aqueous humour proteome: A comparison of the genders (PLoS One). You might remember learning the parts of the eye in school, including the humorous parts: the aqueous humor behind the cornea, and the vitrious humor behind the lens. Unless you’re an opththalmologist, you may not have learned how much that aqueous humor does for you:Aqueous humour (AH) is an important biologic fluid that maintains normal intraocular pressure and contains proteins that regulate the homeostasis of ocular tissues. Any alterations in the protein compositions are correlated to the pathogenesis of various ocular disorders. … A total of 147 proteins were identified with a false discovery rate of less than 1% and only the top 10 major AH proteins make up almost 90% of the total identified proteins. A large number of proteins identified were correlated to defence, immune and inflammatory mechanisms, and response to wounding.A little inhibition shapes the brain’s GPS (Kings College London): Who needs directions, guys, when you have a GPS system in your brain? “Researchers from King’s College London have discovered a specific class of inhibitory neurons in the cerebral cortex which plays a key role in how the brain encodes spatial information,” this article says. Want to shoot some hoops? ” In their new study, the researchers reveal that one of the main classes of basket cells plays a key role in how the brain represents and remembers our environment, called spatial information coding.”Chew on this: Physics of chewing in terrestrial mammals (Nature Scientific Reports). No matter how hard or gently you chew, your muscles stay within limits of a power law based on your body mass. This is true for big and small mammals. “All of our experimental data stay within these physical boundaries over six orders of magnitude of body mass regardless of food types.”Gene analysis adds layers to understanding how our livers function (Weizmann Institute). For your daily Wonder Wander, Weizmann tells about your liver. What does the liver do? It lives, doh! But there’s a lot in that living:If you get up in the morning feeling energetic and clearheaded, you can thank your liver for manufacturing glucose before breakfast time. Among a host of other vital functions, it clears our body of toxins and produces most of the carrier proteins in our blood. In a study reported recently in Nature, Weizmann Institute of Science researchers showed that the liver’s amazing multitasking capacity is due at least in part to a clever division of labor among its cells.A genetic analysis showed nine different types of cells in this all-purpose organ. They’re arranged in a purposeful way, too: “The scientists also discovered that certain processes, such as the manufacture of bile, proceed across several different layers, in something like a production line.”Isn’t it wonderful what chance can do over millions and millions of years zzzzz… Wake up! That was a nightmare. Time to rise and become energetic and clearheaded. Thank your liver! Now, go live, walk, flex some muscles, and think logically.last_img read more

  • Cyclist to rack up the Ks to help the elderly

    first_img17 April 2014The aQuelle Tour Durban, one of KwaZulu-Natal’s and South Africa’s premier road cycling races, is a tough enough challenge for the average participant, but for David Kleynhans this year’s race will be part of an epic 3 300km journey to raise funds and awareness for the elderly.Epic journeyKleynhans, 42, an avid road cyclist, will ride from his home in Welgemoed in Cape Town to Durban, covering the 1 600 km trip in seven days, to arrive in Durban in time to start the 105km aQuelle Tour Durban road race on Monday, 28 April.After the event, he will set off on his return journey to his home in the Cape.While Kleynhans is very fit, the trip is more about raising money and drawing attention to the difficulties facing the elderly through his FRAIL charity.‘My first Tour Durban’“This will be my first aQuelle Tour Durban,” he said in a statement on Wednesday.“After I started to cycle, I saw the need to support others. Over the last 10 years I have done one or two tours a year, sometimes three tours in a year.”Kleynhans grew up in the Addo area of the Eastern Cape before moving to Cape Town as a teenager, and spent time in the care of the elderly, and was moved by their plight.‘Heartache’“Through family I was shown the heartache that some seniors have to live with,” he said. “I was shown love, and now I wish to share it with our seniors, who cared for me when I was toddler.”“I am able-bodied and able to care for myself, but who cares for those less fortunate to have any family members?” he asked.FRAILKleynhans’ FRAIL (Friendship, Relatives, Acceptance, Involvement, Love) programme will benefit from his fundraising efforts, which will be driven by sponsorships and the sale of raffle tickets.“I am asking people to sponsor me four cents per kilometre. That’s R65 one way,” Kleynhans explained. “Every R65 sponsorship will get an entry into the raffle.”He will also be interacting with community and local government leaders on each stage of his trip to seek support.Charity driveThe aQuelle Tour Durban has a very strong charity drive, and through Club Cappuccino the race supports the Domino Foundation, which serves the Amaoti community. Numerous individual riders use the race to either raise funds for charities of their own, or simply ride to raise awareness of these organisations and causes.KLENYHANS’ SCHEDULE20 April: Cape Town to Laingsburg. 275km21 April: Laingsburg to Beaufort West. 200km22 April: Beaufort West to Graaff-Reinet. 204km23 April: Graaff- Reinet to Queenstown. 280km24 April: Queenstown to Qumbu. 280km25 April: Qumbu to Port Shepstone. 250km26 April: Port Shepstone to Durban. 120km28 April: aQuelle Tour Durban. 105km29 April: Depart Durban for Cape Town.5 May: Arrive in Cape Town.To learn more about Kleynhans’ ride, or to support him, please visit the following websites: The Hub Cycling Forums, Frail Cycling to Help Old Age Homes on Facebook, Frail David Kleynhans on Facebook, or Frail Kleynhans on Twitter.last_img read more

  • Groundspeak Weekly Newsletter – June 1, 2011

    first_imgThe New GPS Adventures Canada MazeGroundspeak and Minotaur Mazes have launched a new GPS Adventures in Canada! GPS Adventures Canada is a smaller version of the GPS Adventures Maze Exhibit currently touring North America. GPS Adventures Canada prominently features Alberta’s Canadian Badlands and showcases some of the best geocaches in the country. Geocachers who log their attendance at the GPS Adventures Canada Maze will earn a unique icon for the GPS Adventures Maze Exhibit Cache type.The Centennial Place Recreation Complex in Three Hills, Alberta will host the exhibit from June 4, 2011 through July 31, 2011. On July 15, Groundspeak’s Jeremy Irish will visit Three Hills for a meet and greet event celebrating the launch of the Canadian Maze. Log your “will attends” today!Introduce a New Geocacher, $1 Goes to Classrooms in NeedIntroduce your friends to geocaching from now through June 30 and we will donate $1 to DonorsChoose.org, up to a total of $10,000! Make sure to let your friends know that they need to sign up for an account, enter your username in the referral field and log a cache all within the month of June in order to be eligible. The best way to introduce someone new is to take them geocaching, but if that’s not possible, log in to Geocaching.com and send them the tell a friend email. For complete details on the promotion, visit the Geocaching.com blog. See how many people you can refer as a community – follow your progress on the referral thermometer in the sidebar of the blog.Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedGroundspeak Weekly Newsletter – September 14, 2011September 14, 2011In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”Groundspeak Weekly Newsletter – May 5, 2011May 11, 2011In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”Groundspeak Weekly Newsletter – January 12, 2012January 12, 2012In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”last_img read more

  • New England Award Winners

    first_imgIt’s even bigger than it looksKingsbury’s entry is a spec-built home with four bedrooms and four baths on the upper level, two half-baths on the first floor and another full bath in the basement. The house measures 4,200 sq. ft., with an additional 1,500 sq. ft. of finished space in the basement.“At 86 ft. long, this rambling stretched-out cape is not the usual compact rectangular design typically found in a super insulated home,” an online description of the project says.Kingsbury’s Franz J. Burke says the idea was to build a “green home that doesn’t look like a green home.” It was designed by Keith Gross of HDS Architecture of Cambridge, Mass.Features include double-stud wall construction, insulated to R-40 with open-cell polyurethane foam, and a foam-insulated R-60 roof. The basement walls and slab are insulated to R-20. The house has triple-glazed windows, a heat recovery ventilator, and a high-efficiency gas furnace. Air leakage was tested at 0.97 air changes per hour at a pressure difference of 50 pascals (ach50).Burke says the house has a HERS Index of 37 and a heat load of 35,000 Btu/hr.Burke is a former bank appraiser who has been building houses only since 2006. The Weston house, his sixth or seventh project, was built on spec and later sold for $1.94 million. A Passivhaus building in Vermont and a “green home that doesn’t look like a green home” were among the projects that won first-place PRISM Awards this year from the Builders and Remodelers Association of Greater Boston.A four-bedroom home in Weston, Mass., built by Kingsbury Homes Limited, won the gold award for the most innovative single-family green design.The best energy efficient project was a Passivhaus-certified home in Norwich, Vermont. ZeroEnergy Design, provided design and Passivhaus consulting for the project. Bensonwood provided building panels and construction for the house. Paul Bilgen was the consulting architect.PRISM Awards are made in a number of building and marketing cateogies (the acronym stands for Prestigious Results in Sales and Marketing). A full list of award winners is posted at the association’s web site. Passivhaus-certified in VermontThe winner in the energy efficient category has already received a good bit of attention, including an article by GBA’s Richard Defendorf posted in 2010.As described at the time, the three-bedroom, 2 1/2-bath house was designed with R-60 above-grade walls, a roof insulated to R-87 and R-36 basement walls. The slab was insulated to R-75. The 2,700-sq. ft. house has been certified by the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS) and was constructed on a 100-acre farmstead.Air leakage was measured at a very low 0.49 ach50. The house has triple-glazed windows, a wood-burning stove and electric radiant floors in the bathrooms. It has a solar hot water system and, adds ZeroEnergy Design, would be net-zero energy with the addition of a 3.5 kW photovoltaic array.In addition to its energy features, the house has non-toxic and no-VOC paints, adhesives and finishes, and a heat recovery ventilator.Panels were built off site by Bensonwood, trucked to the lot and moved into place by crane, making a weather-tight shell very quickly. Estes and Gallup was the general contractor.last_img read more

  • Can Good Really Come from Bad? Understanding Posttraumatic Growth

    first_imgBy: Bari Sobelson, MS, LMFTPixabay[Sunset Sky, January 4, 2014, by Adina Voicu]Most of us know about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder at this point. We may have heard about it in relation to the experience of combat veterans, natural disasters, or any other traumatic life event or crisis. Some of us may even know someone who suffers from PTSD. But, there is a new term related to the experience of traumatic events and life crises coined by Posttraumatic Growth Research Group at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Posttraumatic Growth is the idea that something positive comes from these negative experiences- growth. The group contends that while this idea is certainly not new, the systematic study of this is, in fact, relatively new.According to the PTG Research Group, the growth has a tendency to happen in the following 5 areas:New opportunities have emerged from the struggle– perhaps the experience has opened the door for opportunities that may not have presented themselves before.Change in relationships with others– a traumatic event may bring people closer together for various reasons.Increased sense of own strength– the trauma may have shown the survivor that they have more strength than they ever imagined, having survived the experience.Greater appreciation for life– the event may have “opened the eyes” of the survivor to new aspects of life they never saw before.Change in or deepening of religious/spiritual beliefs– It is quite possible that the experience could shift spiritual/religious beliefs in various ways, depending on the person.While PTG Research Group recognizes the potential for the growth from traumatic experiences, they also see the importance in acknowledging the following:While people may experience growth from traumatic events, they still suffer.There is no implication that traumatic events are good.Not everyone who experiences a traumatic event will experience growthSo, can good really come from bad? The answer: there is certainly potential for growth.ReferencesU.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: https://www.va.govThe University of North Carolina at Charlotte: http://www.uncc.eduPosttraumatic Growth  Research Group:  http://ptgi.uncc.eduThis post was written by Bari Sobelson, MS, LMFT, the Social Media and Programming Coordination Specialist for the MFLN Family Development Team. The Family Development team aims to support the development of professionals working with military families.  Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network Family Development concentration on our website, Facebook, and Twitter.last_img read more